evolgen

Archives for March, 2008

As I have mentioned before, de novo sequencing of whole eukaryotic genomes may be a thing of the past (or, at least, these whole genome projects won’t be getting very much more common). Instead, I proposed that people would use the new high-throughput technologies to sequence parts of the genome they found interesting. What did…

Sleep, Sex, and Drosophila

60 Minutes ran a special on the science of sleep this week. The special included an interview with Scott McRobert about sleep deprivation and mating in Drosophila. So if lack of sleep impacts our appetite, our metabolism, our memory, and how we age, is there anything it doesn’t affect? How about sex? Scientist Scott McRobert…

Try this line in a bar this weekend:

It’s not very funny, but it’s about a topic that comes up around here often (groans…). That said, this is something you’d expect to see over at Genomicron, not evolgen. In fact, the guy looks a bit like a young TR Gregory. For the full strip, go here.

The Next Generation Sequencing blog has a post on low coverage of A/T regions with Solexa sequencing. The post is in reference to a paper in Nature Methods on genome resequencing in C. elegans (doi:10.1038/nmeth.1179). Here’s how the NextGen Sequencing blog summarizes it: However, it points to a general lack of coverage in A/T rich…

The Demise of PLoS?

I really like the PLoS journals. Their mission — to make research freely available — is totally awesome. And, on top of that, the journals publish very interesting research. PLoS Biology is a top notch journal, with papers on par with those in Science and Nature. And the specialty journals, like PLoS Genetics and PLoS…

Genomics and DNA Barcoding

Identifying and cataloging biological diversity is challenging. One way to do go about IDing all the life forms is to sequence a known region of the genome in all those species. This is known as DNA barcoding. An article in PNAS reports on the DNA sequence of a gene found useful for DNA barcoding in…

Judson on Junk and Genome Size

Olivia Judson (aka, Dr. Tatiana) has a blog at the NYTimes website. It’s usually a good read, but she has been known to go off the deep end. In this week’s entry, Judson posts on how bones are not the only fossils. What other fossils does Judson write about? Genomes. Judson’s focus is on genome…

Stuff White ScienceBloggers Like

Apparently, ScienceBlogs is loaded with white people. Hell, the whitest person I know blogs in this very domain. That got me thinking. Sure, we may look white. But are we really white? I mean, really white. So white that we like the stuff white people like.

Charlesworth on Lynch

Brian Charlesworth has reviewed Michael Lynch’s The Origins of Genome Architecture for Current Biology. Charlesworth’s review is generally positive, and he agrees that population size may be an important factor in genome evolution. However, he thinks that Lynch overplays the role relaxed selective constraint in small populations plays in the evolution of genomic complexity. Charlesworth…

One of the drums I beat around here pertains to inferring demographic history using molecular markers (i.e., DNA data). I’ve been known to go off on people who make claims about ancestral population sizes based on studies of a single locus or gene. You see, studying a single locus only gives you the evolutionary history…