Drosophila

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Category archives for Drosophila

Two More Drosophila Genomes

The world of genomics is changing. It was initially about sequencing the genome a single representative individual from a particular species. Now, there’s a large focus on polymorphism — that is, sequencing multiple individuals from a single species to study the genomic variation in that species. That’s well under way in humans, with HapMap and…

Previous entries: Part 1 – Introduction Part 2 – The Backstory Part 3 – Obtaining Sequences This post is part of a series exploring the evolution of a duplicated gene in the genus Drosophila. Links to the previous posts are above. Part 4 of this series (Obtaining More Sequences) can be found below. Obtaining More…

Previous entries: Part 1 – Introduction Part 2 – The Backstory This post is part of a series exploring the evolution of a duplicated gene in the genus Drosophila. Links to the previous posts are above. Part 3 of this series (Obtaining Sequences) can be found below. Obtaining Sequences In the previous post I described…

This is a repost (with some edits) of an introduction to publishing original research on blogs — a series I am reintroducing. The original entry can be found here. Previous entries: Part 1 – Introduction This post is part of a series exploring the evolution of a duplicated gene in the genus Drosophila. Links to…

Carl Zimmer has a post covering three recent papers on gene duplication: one on amylase variation in humans, one on whole genome duplication in yeast, and one on duplications of genes in the Drosophila arizonae reproductive tract. In all three papers, results are presented showing the importance of duplicated genes in adapting to the environment.…

That Crab Has Flies

Among my many pet peeves are when people refer to Drosophila as fruit flies (they are not). Real fruit flies (Tephritids) feed, mate, and lay their eggs on live fruit — for this reason, many are agricultural pests (e.g., the medfly). Drosophila, on the other hand, feed on the micro-organisms found primarily on rotting fruit…

Sorting the Pancakes that Make up a Genome

Genome rearrangements are fast becoming one of the most interesting aspects of comparative genomics (I may be slightly biased in my perspective). We have known for quite some time that genomes of different species (and even within species) differ by inversions of their chromosomes (this was first studied in Drosophila). In fact, some of the…

Language Log is Stealing My Business

Mark Liberman at Language Log has been posting on genetics recently. A couple of days ago he tried to track down the origins of the components of the gene name BTBD9. The letters and numbers in the name stand for complex-tramtrack-bric-a-brac-domain 9, which are hijacked from Drosophila nomenclature. Liberman then tries to figure out the…

Drosophila Smell and Taste

Sensing and reacting to one’s environment is necessary for survival. Different species have different expertise in regards to how they sense their environment. Humans, for example, have reduced olfactory abilities relative to other mammals, but excellent color vision. Cats have good night vision, but poor vision during day light. These proficiencies and deficiencies in sensory…

Lots of Pretty Wings in PLoS ONE

In a new article in PLoS ONE, a group of researchers led by Kevin Edwards present a collection of images of Hawaiian Drosophila wings. Here’s one figure from the paper showing the evolutionary relationships of a bunch of different clades and some representative wing patterns: The authors point out that, with the availability of the…