Genetics

evolgen

Category archives for Genetics

What is a Gene?

It’s not entirely obvious at first, but this article in the New York Times is about the problems with gene patents in a world where one gene does not equal one protein. Now, we’ve known that this model isn’t entirely correct, what with alternative splicing and all. Additionally, the human genome also contains many “genes”…

Two Genetics Blog Carnivals for Today

There are two genetics blog carnivals available for your perusing today. First is Gene Genie hosted by Hsien at Eye on DNA. The second is Mendel’s Garden, over at The Daily Transcript. Hsien will also be hosting the next edition of Mendel’s Garden. Visit the Mendel’s Garden webpage if you’d like to contribute to the…

New York Times Cracks

Let’s go through the basics again. Cracking the genetic code refers to figuring out how DNA encodes the information to make proteins — that was done decades ago. Sequencing a genome does not mean that you have decoded the genome; presumably, decoding a genome would mean you’ve figured out the function of every part of…

The Canadian research organization Genome BC has unveiled a science education website, Genomics Education. One of the features of the website is Floyd the Fruit Fly, who, we can only presume, is some sort of cartoon drosophilid. Or maybe he’s a tephritid, but I highly doubt it. When you hear “fruit fly” and “genetics”, you…

Internet Odds and Ends

Rick at My Biotech Life is organizing all the genetics feeds into a single Feedburner feed. The DNA Network is a collection of feeds from sites that blog on genetics. You can subscribe to the DNA Network Feed to get the web’s best genetics content delivered to your newsreader. If you would like to join…

Stuff and Things

Here’s some interesting science: A commonly used medicinal leach may have been misidentified as the wrong species. Here is a description of the Human Variome Project, which seems more focused on mapping disease genes than doing cool population genetics. That’s too bad. Science has an article on the benefits of undergraduate research. The most important…

A Post on Sex Chromosomes

A few articles have come out recently dealing with sex chromosomes in a variety of taxa. Here are some links to those articles, in list form: Given all we know about vertebrate sex chromosomes, it’s surprising that we don’t know how sex determination works in many fish, including the pufferfish Takifugu rubripes. That’s especially surprising…

Genetics of Speciation

The most recent issue of the Journal of Heredity contains a bunch of articles from a symposium on the “Genetics of Speciation” organized by Loren Rieseberg. Included in the collection is an article by Allen Orr and two of his students on speciation in Drosophila, which discusses mapping speciation genes, the role of meiotic drive…

Recent Stuff

A lot of interesting evolutionary genetics research gets published, and I don’t have time to write an insightful commentary on all of it (some may argue that I have never written an insightful commentary on anything). Here’s a brief overview of the stuff I have missed in the past few weeks: A population of sheep…

Epigenetics does not Refute Darwin

According to Physorg.com, this study on epigenetic inheritance in chickens “shake[s] Darwin’s foundation”. Who knew inheritance in a flightless bird could induce an earthquake in northern Australia? That’s not what they’re referring to? They’re not claiming that a neo-Lamarckian process could produce seismic activity? For everyone running around like a chicken with its head cut…