Genomics

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Category archives for Genomics

Genomics and DNA Barcoding

Identifying and cataloging biological diversity is challenging. One way to do go about IDing all the life forms is to sequence a known region of the genome in all those species. This is known as DNA barcoding. An article in PNAS reports on the DNA sequence of a gene found useful for DNA barcoding in…

Judson on Junk and Genome Size

Olivia Judson (aka, Dr. Tatiana) has a blog at the NYTimes website. It’s usually a good read, but she has been known to go off the deep end. In this week’s entry, Judson posts on how bones are not the only fossils. What other fossils does Judson write about? Genomes. Judson’s focus is on genome…

Charlesworth on Lynch

Brian Charlesworth has reviewed Michael Lynch’s The Origins of Genome Architecture for Current Biology. Charlesworth’s review is generally positive, and he agrees that population size may be an important factor in genome evolution. However, he thinks that Lynch overplays the role relaxed selective constraint in small populations plays in the evolution of genomic complexity. Charlesworth…

Jonathan Eisen’s been blogging the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting in Marco Island. Here’s what he’s written so far: Advances in Genome Biology and Technology Meeting – First Post AGBT Marco Usland Update – Long Live Sequencing Marco Island Evening One – The Strange and the Good More notes from Marco Island/…

How Easy is it to Write About Junk DNA?

Alex is pissed about science writers neglecting important discoveries in cell biology: Why are cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, microbiology never covered in the media? I’ve spoken to so many science journalists – most of whom have no science training. I’ve come to the conclusion that the barrier is too high – as a result…

Gene Chips and Conspiracy Theories

What’s a gene chip? Well, it’s not a gene chip, that’s for sure. It’s a microarray. It has various parts of a genome arrayed on a small chip. The parts of the genome you put on the chip depends on what you’re interested in studying. You then take some DNA you’re interested in and apply…

Matt Nisbet thinks that Francis Collins should be the next presidential science advisor. He does this after rejecting excellent popularizes of science, such as Neil deGrasse Tyson and E.O. Wilson, on the following grounds: Most science popularizers such as Wilson or Tyson don’t have the years of government experience to understand the machinations of Federal…

Genetics Links

There are two recent genetics related posts on other blogs that evolgen readers might find interesting: First, check out Query Gene (via ScienceRoll). This web-ap allows you to couple a nucleotide blast search with a Google search for a term related to your blast query. Here is how the creators describe it: Query Gene is…

Geese, Ganders, and Genomes

I previously described where in a genome we would expect to find sexually antagonistic genes. Briefly, depending on whether a gene is male-biased or female-biased and whether beneficial mutations are dominant or recessive, we can predict whether these sexually antagonistic genes will be on X chromosomes or autosomes. As I mentioned in that post, the…

Sequencing, Mapping, and Chips!

I came across two press releases yesterday, entitled: Entire Yeast Genome Sequenced and University of Toronto scientists map entire yeast genome Upon reading the first, I thought, hasn’t the entire genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae already been sequenced? And haven’t other yeast genomes been sequenced as well? What in the world could they be referring to?…