Population Genetics

evolgen

Category archives for Population Genetics

There’s been a whole lot of hype around the Hawks et al. paper describing a recent burst of adaptive evolution in the human genome. The problem is a lot of people are conflating accelerated adaptive evolution with accelerated evolution. Take this for example: 12/11: Accelerated Human Evolution In recent years, humans have evolved at a…

Recent Accelerated Adaptive Evolution in Humans

For those of you interested in recent adaptive evolution in some insignificant bipedal primate, John Hawks and pals have published a paper in PNAS describing something you’ll find interesting. Of course, if you’re interested in such things, you already know that. Here are some links related to Hawks et al. paper: The Hawks et al.…

Geese, Ganders, and Genomes

I previously described where in a genome we would expect to find sexually antagonistic genes. Briefly, depending on whether a gene is male-biased or female-biased and whether beneficial mutations are dominant or recessive, we can predict whether these sexually antagonistic genes will be on X chromosomes or autosomes. As I mentioned in that post, the…

Of Geese and Ganders

Brian at Laelaps has written a post entitled “What’s good for the gander isn’t always good for the goose“, in which he describes some examples of sexual dimorphism in charismatic vertebrates. Studying the phenotypes of these traits is interesting, but what’s happening on the genomic level? That is, how do differences between males and females…

Two More Drosophila Genomes

The world of genomics is changing. It was initially about sequencing the genome a single representative individual from a particular species. Now, there’s a large focus on polymorphism — that is, sequencing multiple individuals from a single species to study the genomic variation in that species. That’s well under way in humans, with HapMap and…

LOL Sieve

Haldane never had it so good: (Via Shelley.)

Zombie Labs Eat Brain Genes

Remember the story about how we inherited the gene that gives us human brains from Neanderthals? The genetic data that were used to reach that conclusion (or a slightly less over-the-top conclusion) were part of a couple of other studies that identified signatures of adaptive evolution in genes involved in brain development. Those results were…

Junk on Cancer

The University of Michigan has put out a press release entitled: Bits of ‘junk’ RNA aid master tumor-suppressor gene With a title like that, how could I not blog the hell out of this bastard? I mean, they even put the scare quotes around “junk”. Like that — like I just did. Amazing! The story…

There’s been a lot of recent interest in sequences that are highly conserved between humans and other mammals (and even other non-mammalian vertebrates). These sequences are thought to be under purifying selection, which prevents the accumulation of substitutions after two evolutionary lineages diverge. We cannot rule out, however, that the sequences are conserved by either…

I’d be remiss to not mention this paper from Hopi Hoekstra’s group after I previously discussed the anti-evo-devo paper she wrote with Jerry Coyne. The premise of the paper from Hoekstra and Coyne is that Sean Carroll overplays the importance of cis-regulatory changes in the evolution of form. Well, Hoekstra and colleagues mapped the genes…