Statistics

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Category archives for Statistics

Silent Mutations Continue to Speak Up

Pim van Meurs has a blog post at The Panda’s Thumb about the recent paper on translational selection on a synonymous polymorphic site in a eukaryotic gene (DOI link). He points out that this was predicted in a paper from 1987. In short, the rate of translation depends on the tRNA pool — amino acids…

Chance, Stochasticity, Probability and Evolution

John Wilkins has replied to Larry Moran on the role of “chance” in evolution (incidentally, Moran replies to Wilkins on the same topic, but a different post by Wilkins). Here’s what Larry wrote: Nobody denies the power of natural selection and nobody claims that natural selection is random or accidental. However, the idea that everything…

Adaptive Evolution in Genomes

Adam Eyre-Walker has published a review of adaptive evolution in a few well studied systems: Drosophila, humans, viruses, Arabidopsis, etc. These organisms have been the subject of many studies that used DNA polymorphism, DNA divergence, or a combination of the two to detect natural selection in both protein coding and non-coding regions of the genomes.…

Is Your City a Sports Haven or Sports Hell?

It’s Saturday on the second weekend of the college football season. Tomorrow (Sunday) marks the opening of the NFL season (okay, the season really kicked off Thursday night). Also, we’re hitting the home stretch of the major league baseball season, and the playoffs are just around the corner. With all of that in mind, this…

Creationist Probability

ABC News has an article by mathematician John Allen Paulos on how creationists misuse probability in their anti-science arguments. This article is inspired by the Science article on public acceptance of evolution. I especially like how he distinguishes between a priori and a posteri probabilities: Now if we shuffle this deck of cards for a…

Variance in Laboratory Experiments

Given the expected frequency of a certain outcome of a replicate in an experiment, we can estimate the expected variance around that mean (either by deriving it or performing simulations). I have heard that laboratory experiments tend to have greater variances than expected due to conditions not included in the model (ie, we can’t control…

Joe Morgan the Creationist

Joe Morgan is a Hall of Fame baseball player and a former member of the Cincinnati’s Big Red Machine. He is also a commentator for ESPN and a strong opponent of all the new fangled baseball statistics. Anyone who has listened to an ESPN broadcast of Major League Baseball has heard Morgan criticize the Moneyball…

Rejecting the Neutral Model

Last September, Bruce Lahn and colleagues published a couple of papers on the evolution of two genes responsible for brain development in humans (ASPM and Microcephalin). A group led by Sally Otto published a criticism of the analysis performed by Lahn’s group in last week’s issue of Science (JP has written a good summary on…

Genomics and Evolution

Andy Clark has written a review of comparative evolutionary genomics for Trends in Ecology and Evolution. His review deals with identifying functional regions of the genome and inference of both positively and negatively selected sequences. Clark is one of the leaders in the field of evolutionary genetics (and now genomics), actively participating in the analysis…

A Post for the Soccer/Football Fans

The Nature Newsblog is reporting that mathematicians have shown that scoring begets more scoring in soccer football association football. I don’t have access to the Nature News article, but it appears that World Cup goals cannot be modeled as Poisson random variables. Wondering why I called it association football? Do you know where the term…