Statistics

evolgen

Category archives for Statistics

A poll of 1,200 undergrads at 100 colleges in the United States found that 73% of the students think iPods are “in”. One tenth of all old people know that “in” means “hip”. Half of all old people think “hip” means “the thing I just got replaced”. Drinking beer and stalking Facebook tied for second…

This paper is rather timely considering I just finished reviewing methods for detecting natural selection. Jonathan Pritchard‘s group has scanned SNP data from three populations (Europeans, East Asians, and Nigerians) for signatures of positive natural selection. The authors used measures of polymorphism to detect natural selection. In their approach, they polarized polymorphic SNPs as ancestral…

Detecting Natural Selection (Part 7)

Polymorphism and Divergence This is the eighth of multiple postings I plan to write about detecting natural selection using molecular data (ie, DNA sequences). The introduction can be found here. The first post described the organization of the genome, and the second described the organization of genes. The third post described codon based models for…

What to do with Your Negative Results

My advisor received an email from a fairly prominent geneticist regarding some results published by Dobzhansky over fifty years ago. The geneticist had done some back of the envelope calculations and noticed some trends that had been overlooked for a half of a century. We happened to have the animals to replicate the experiments (and…

The Coalescent

One of the most important developments in evolutionary biology in the past few decades has come without much fanfare outside of a small circle of population geneticists. The early models of population genetics were limited when it came to analyzing the nucleotide sequence polymorphism data that began to appear in the 1980s. New statistical techniques…

Poisson Hockey

If you like sports (specifically hockey) and you like statistics, two posts from Tom Benjamin’s NHL Blog are must reads (available here and here). With help from Dave Savit, a math professor at the University of Arizona, Tom describes how hockey can be modeled using a Poisson distribution. There are also Poisson Standings for the…

Doctoring Your Way to a Doctorate

If you have not read it, go check out Nicholas Wade’s article on doctored images in scientific publications. This is especially pertinent given the recent Hwang Woo Suk stem cell debacle. There is nothing all that revolutionary, but Wade gives a nice review and introduces us to some of the editors who are trying to…

Detecting Natural Selection (Part 7)

Nucleotide Polymorphism and Selection This is the seventh of multiple postings I plan to write about detecting natural selection using molecular data (ie, DNA sequences). The introduction can be found here. The first post described the organization of the genome, and the second described the organization of genes. The third post described codon based models…