Archives for February, 2007

Johnson on the Current State of ID

During my recent hiatus Phillip Johnson emerged from his hidey hole and posted some new expectorations regarding the current state of ID. I realize other bloggers have already ripped into Johnson’s ill-considered comments, but why should they have all the fun! He begins with his standard tripe about finch beaks:

Monkey Girl

If there’s one good thing about spending an extra night in Buffalo, without access to a computer and with a rather limited selection of channels on the television, it’s that you get a lot of reading done. I managed to plow through all of Edward Humes’ book Monkey Girl: Evolution, Education, Religion and the Battle…

An Evening at the CFI

I’d like to thank Barry Karr of The Center for Inquiry for the invitation to speak at their Darwin Day event. The event itself went off smoothly, and I was well taken care of during my travel woes. All in all, a highly successful weekend. The afternoon began with a screening of Inherit the Wind.…

Back From Buffalo!

My quick little jaunt up to Buffalo ended up being not so quick. The plan was to fly up on Friday, do my thing on Saturday, then fly back on Sunday. Quick and painless! Sadly, a snowstorm in Buffalo coupled with an even bigger storm in Washington DC left me stranded for an extra day…

Shuffling Off to Buffalo

Just a reminder that this Saturday, February 24th, I will be speaking at the Center for Inquiry in Amherst, NY. The festivities start at 3:00 with a screening of Inherit the Wind, Then, after a dinner break, I will be speaking at 6:00. More information can be obtained by contacting Barry Karr at (716) 636-4869…

Brief Blog Break

I’m afraid I’m going to have to extend my blog vacation a bit longer. Too many deadlines this week. Sorry about that. Try to solider on without me!

Shermer/Dembski Debate

Sorry for the lack of blogging this week. A combination of life being busy, busy, busy and the outside world being icy, icy, icy. I did, however, manage to wander down to Bridgewater, VA last night to attend an evolution/ID debate between Skeptic Magazine publisher Michael Shermer and longtime ID flak William Dembski. I have…

Why is This in the New York Times?

From today’s New York Times: There is nothing much unusual about the 197-page dissertation Marcus R. Ross submitted in December to complete his doctoral degree in geosciences here at the University of Rhode Island. His subject was the abundance and spread of mosasaurs, marine reptiles that, as he wrote, vanished at the end of the…

Carnival of Mathematics!

Alon Levy of Abstract Nonsense has posted the inaugural edition of the Carnival of Mathematics. If you’re looking for some great math blogging, I recommend having a look.

Get to Know Me!

This Monday, February 12, I will be giving a talk to the JMU Freethinker’s Club on the subject of evolution and creationism. The talk will be from 7:00-8:00 in room 303, Taylor Hall on the James Madison University campus. If you live anywhere Harrisonburg, VA, stop on by! Then, on Saturday, February 24, I will…

Harris Replies to Sullivan

Sam Harris has replied to the Andrew Sullivan essay I discussed in Wednesday’s post. Let’s consider some highlights:

ASM Statement on Evolution

American Society for Microbiology has now issued this statement in support of evolution and against intelligent design:

Sullivan’s Latest

The blogalogue between Sam Harris and Andrew Sullivan on the subject of the reasonableness of religious faith continues. We pick up the action with Sullivan’s latest salvo. He is responding to the following question asked by Harris: “What would constitute “proof” for you that your current beliefs about God are mistaken? (i.e., what would get…

Creationism in Kenya

From CNN comes this useful article about a planned display of fossils at a museum in Kenya: Deep in the dusty, unlit corridors of Kenya’s national museum, locked away in a plain-looking cabinet, is one of mankind’s oldest relics: Turkana Boy, as he is known, the most complete skeleton of a prehistoric human ever found.…

The Progressive Monty Hall Problem

Having just spent three hours explaining the value of trigonometric substitutions and partial fraction expansions to not very enthusiastic calculus students, I’m not really in the mood for a lengthy post today. So how about yet another variation on the Monty Hall problem. In this version the contestant is shown 10 identical doors. One contains…