Archives for April, 2007

Maher on Religion

Bill Maher showed up on Scarborough Country yesterday to explain his problems with organized religion. Since I can’t improve on his eloquent and spot-on comments, I will simply reproduce them beneath the fold. Enjoy!

Wiley Apologizes

I am happy to report that the little dust-up between Shelley Batts and Wiley has ended peacefully. Wiley has apologized for their rather heavy-handed treatment of the matter. When I read the good news over at Shelley’s blog, I had a number of reactions. Happily Rob Knop has saved me the trouble of having to…

Commenting on the recommendation of the Vatican International Theological Commission to eliminate the concept of limbo, Michelle Tsai, writing for Slate, offers some interesting thoughts on past efforts by church leaders to resolve the final destination of baby souls in the afterlife. It’s nice that today there is a growing theological awareness of God’s mercy,…

The Vatican Eliminates Limbo

From the Catholic News Service: After several years of study, the Vatican’s International Theological Commission said there are good reasons to hope that babies who die without being baptized go to heaven. In a document published April 20, the commission said the traditional concept of limbo — as a place where unbaptized infants spend eternity…

Legal Harassment of Retrospectacle

In this post, my SciBling Shelley Batts, of Retrospectacle, analyzed a recent paper claiming that fruit becomes healthier when consumed with alcohol. Something about boosting the antioxidant properties of the fruit. Interesting stuff. Even more interesting was what happened next. The paper in question was published in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture,…

Ooblog presents a fascinating exchange that he had with Discovery Institute blogger Michael Egnor. The exchange centers on Egnor’s oft repeated challenge to Darwinists to explain how it is possible for naturalistic processes to explain the growth of information during evolution. This nonsensical argument is a frequent guest in creationist and ID literature. Ooblog quite…

It Just Isn’t Fair!

Via P.Z. Myers, I came across this post, from George Shollenberger. He is the author of a book entitled The First Scientific Proof of God, which tells you pretty much everything you need to know about him. He seems vexed by the number of atheists here at ScienceBlogs. He writes:

Comments on O’Reilly

If you’re curious, in an interview lasting just over four and a half minutes, Bill O’Reilly uttered 609 words, while Dawkins uttered a mere 342. Considering the way O’Reilly usually treats his guests, that’s a pretty good ratio. At the start of every show, O’Reilly gives the headlines of the major stories he will be…

Well, Richard Dawkins had his little run-in with Bill O’Reilly tonight. No doubt surprised to have an A-list guest on his show, O’Reilly managed to keep the stupidity to a minimum (though, as we shall see, he certainly did not manage to eliminate it entirely). He was also on his best behavior. Since Fox News,…

For my Virginia based readers, Nikhil Rao, founder of the group Conservatives Against Intelligent Design, will be speaking to the Alliance for Science tomorrow, April 24. The talk will be held at the Arlington Central Library, 1015 N. Quincy Street in Arlington, VA. More information is available here. Conservatives Against Intelligent Design? Sounds like an…

Over at William Dembski’s blog, GilDodgen asks the following:

Pope Benedict on Evolution

With everything else that has been going on lately, I never got around to discussing Pope Benedict’s latest statements on evolution. Here’s what Reuters had to say on the subject: Pope Benedict, elaborating his views on evolution for the first time as Pontiff, says science has narrowed the way life’s origins are understood and Christians…

On Framing, Part Three

Some of the commenters to my previous two posts have suggested that they are tired of this subject. But since Matthew Nisbet himself stopped by to alert me to this post over at his blog, I figure the least I can do is reply to it. The bulk of the post consists of comments from…

On Framing, Part Two

In my previous post on this subject, I described the main faults I see in the Mooney/Nisbet thesis regarding the importance of proper “franimg” in presenting science to the public. In this post I would like to focus specifically on their Washington Post article. In particular, I would like to chastise them for some rather…

On Framing, Part One

My SciBlings Chris Mooney and Matthew Nisbet have created quite a stir recently, first with this article in Science and later with this article for the Washington Post. The basic premise is that scientists need to become more effective communicators, especially on controversial issues like evolution and global warming. In particular, they need to “frame”…