Archives for August, 2007

Time For Another Trip

With the fall semester starting in just under two weeks, it’s time to take off for one last trip. We’re having a big Science Bloggers gathering in New York City this weekend, and I’ve just gotta see for myself that there are actual people behind all these blogs I keep reading. Along the way I’ll…

Edis Interview in Salon

Salon has posted this interview with physicist Taner Edis. You might recognize Edis as the coeditor (with Matt Young) of the magisterial book Why Intelligent Design Fails. The subject of the present interview is his new book, An Illusion of Harmony: Science and Religion in Islam. Edis has a lot of insightful things to say…

Warren on Atheism

Meanwhile, just in case you were looking for something truly stupid, go gawk in amazement at this column by David Warren of The Ottawa Citizen. Here’s the opening: I get such apoplectic letters, whenever I write about “evolutionism,” that I really can’t resist writing about it again. This is not, of course, because I have…

As much as I despise the Republican Party and believe that Democrats do a vastly better job of running the government, there is one area where I think the Republicans have it all over the Dems. They are much more convincing on television. When I see Republican politicians on the various political chat shows, I…

Via P.Z., I came across this article, from the Colorado Springs Gazette, about Christian teenagers abdoning their faith upon reaching college: The trend is known as the “Great Evacuation,” and the statistics are startling to youth ministers. Studies have shown at least 50 percent — and possibly as much as 85 percent — of kids…

Being Casey Luskin

Sometimes I wonder what it is like to be a blogger for the Discovery Institute. Imagine the strain of getting up every morning, swallowing every ounce of pride and intellectual integrity you might possess, and searching desperately through the media for something, anything, you can present as hostile to evolution or favorable to ID. It’s…

New Hominid Fossils Reported

Today’s New York Times has this interesting article about some recent hominid fossil finds. Alas, it falls into the familiar trap of reporting every mundane find as if it is a scientific revolution: Two fossils found in Kenya have shaken the human family tree, possibly rearranging major branches thought to be in a straight ancestral…

Blogger’s Prerogative

After yesterday’s post suggesting that the Democrats hadn’t caved on the FISA vote, a number of commenters and bloggers pointed out to me that the outrage was that the Democratic leadership allowed the bill to come to a vote at all. They could have blocked it, thereby giving more time to push for the more…

The Democrats and FISA

Several of my fellow Science Bloggers have come to a strange conclusion regarding the recent FISA vote in Congress. Ed Brayton titles his post on the subject “Democrats Cave on FISA Amendment.” P.Z. Myers concurs, writing, “It’s a perfect example of the failure of the Democratic party: they allowed the FISA bill to pass, and…

Certain portions of the political blogosphere have erupted over the subject of teacher’s unions. It started with this column, from July 3, by Richard Cohen of The Washington Post. Those of you who follow these things will recognize Cohen as one of the most odious skunks in the punditocracy. Any time his name comes up…

Most people remember Sir Arthur Conan Doyle solely as the creator of Sherlock Holmes. But Doyle was actually quite prolific, and wrote a large number of novels and short stories in a variety of different genres. One of these novels was The Land of Mist, published in 1926. The novel was one of several to…

Slate on Scientology

Well, it’s time to put my Monty Hall woes to one side for the moment and get back to some regular blogging. A heartfelt thnaks to everyone who left comments. I’m a bit behind in replying, but all have been read and pondered. So, while I was busy moping last week Slate posted this interesting…

Sorry for the sporadic blogging. For the past week I’ve been working on the Progressive Monty Hall problem, and it has proven to be considerably more complicated than I at first realized. I had expected to polish it off with a few hours work. Instead I have thought about little else for the past several…