The Big Monty Hall Book has now been reviewed in Mathematical Reviews. The reviewer is Paul Humphreys, a philosophy professor at the University of Virginia. Let’s have a look:

Those intrigued by the original Monty Hall problem will find that this book is a superb source of variants of the problem, pays careful attention to the hidden assumptions behind the problems, and is written in a witty accessible style that never lapses into flippancy. The reader will find here discussions of the classical three-door problem and N-door variants, progressive versions, how to select the sample space, Bayesian treatments of the problems, computer simulations, quantum versions, information-theoretic representations, discussions of the interpretation of probabilities, common cognitive fallacies associated with the problem, and much more. This is a model of how to accessibly introduce mathematical material at an elementary level that is not a mere popularization of the material. A virtue of the book is that it goes beyond mere exposition to make some serious contributions to the discussion, including a proof that the strategy of switching at the last minute in the progressive version is uniquely optimal and a discussion of some philosophical treatments on the topic.

Score!

And the final verdict:

The book contains a comprehensive bibliography on the subject, and is highly recommended for both mathematicians and students.

Score some more!

Comments

  1. #1 Stephen Lucas
    December 14, 2010

    Good to see the continuing positive reviews — and this from a philosopher no less! And a philosopher who believes having mathematical proofs in there is worthwhile, lovely. A highly recommended is all one can ask from for a book. Now will the Sudoku book also be in a “witty accessible style”?

  2. #2 Kevin
    December 14, 2010

    You’re cute when you’re happy…

    LOL.. good for you.. best review ever..

  3. #3 RBH
    December 15, 2010

    Nice!

  4. #4 Bayesian Bouffant, FCD
    December 15, 2010

    Score!
    Score some more!

    Ah, but what’s behind door number three?