Archives for January, 2014

Sunday Chess Problem

Last week we introduced selfmates with a straightforward example that I composed in the late 1980s. This week we feature another representative of this genre. It was created by an American composer named Mark Kirtley, in 1986. In the position below, white is to play and force selfmate in eight moves. (Recall that this means…

A Math Puzzle

Here’s a little brainteaser for you. What do these four fractions have in common? As it happens, these are the only four fractions where the top and bottom are both two-digit numbers that have this property. Feel free to leave suggestions in the comments. Good luck!

An Interesting Logic Textbook

Jeffrey Shallit has an interesting post up about The Southern Confederacy Arithmetic, a mathematics textbook published in 1864. Some of its idiosyncratic examples make for amusing reading. Reading Jeffrey’s post reminded me of a textbook I picked up at home-schoolers convention a while back. The book is called Intermediate Logic For Christian and Home Schools,…

As If To Prove My Point…

Just in case you are still wondering why college professors tend to be politically liberal, the last few days have provided three examples that make my point perfectly. First up, we have this piece from Bret Stephens, writing at The Wall Street Journal. Stephens’s piece is behind a pay-wall, but this essay at HuffPo quotes…