Evolving Thoughts

Getting rid of “Darwinism”

Good to see that Olivia Judson has finally caught up with me

Comments

  1. #1 Thony C.
    July 16, 2008

    Can we also dump Copernicanism while we’re about it?

  2. #2 clinteas
    July 16, 2008

    I disagree that the problem with the “-ism” is that it suggests a finality to Darwins arguments,that he was the “beginning and end of evolutionary biology”.
    The term is not one usually used by scientists,its being propagated by Creationists,the DI and their ilk,and just represents their particular Goebbels-esque tendency to create “isms” to devalue certain theories by turning them into an -ism,Darwinist,Evulutionist etc…..

  3. #3 Ian
    July 16, 2008

    I’m relatively sure that Einsteinism needs to go, too, as well as ismism.

  4. #4 James F
    July 16, 2008

    Ulrich Kutschera of the University of Kassel has suggested introducing the term “Darwin-Wallace principle of natural selection” (Nature 453:27, 2008).

  5. #5 AntiquatedTory
    July 16, 2008

    I’m sure in German that’s one word, too.

  6. #6 John S. Wilkins
    July 16, 2008

    Let’s see: Der Darwinische-WallaceischeSatzdernatürlicheAuslese…

    How do Germans breathe, anyway?

  7. #7 RBH
    July 17, 2008

    What’s that line from E. B. White? Something like “She dove into the sea of her sentence, and finally emerged, panting, on the other side, with her verb in her teeth.”

    (He probably used fewer commas. :))

  8. #8 Thony C.
    July 17, 2008

    Let’s see: Der Darwinische-WallaceischeSatzdernatuerlicheAuslese…

    How do Germans breathe, anyway?

    Durch ihren Arschloch natuerlich!

  9. #9 James F
    July 17, 2008

    *sigh*

    Everyone’s a comedian!

  10. #10 Owlmirror
    July 17, 2008

    What’s that line from E. B. White? Something like “She dove into the sea of her sentence, and finally emerged, panting, on the other side, with her verb in her teeth.”

    For values of E. B. White that equal S. L. Clemens, anyway.

    “Whenever the literary German dives into a sentence, that is the last you are going to see of him till he emerges on the other side of his Atlantic with his verb in his mouth.”

  11. #11 Jim Thomerson
    July 17, 2008

    Units are often called for names of discoverers: Ohms, Volts, Newtons, Einsteins, etc. Does anyone use the evolutionary unit, the Darwin? A Darwin is a 1% change in the gene pool of a population over one generation.

  12. #12 Dan S.
    July 19, 2008

    Does anyone use the evolutionary unit, the Darwin? A Darwin is a 1% change in the gene pool of a population over one generation.

    I think they should refer to a kilodarwin as a “gould”.

    (Incidentally, there seem to be different definitions of what a darwin is floating around, or are they equivalent and I just not understanding? (very, very possible).

  13. #13 John S. Wilkins
    July 19, 2008

    According to Wikipedia a darwin is an e-fold amount of change over one million years, and was devised by J. B. S. Haldane. I think it is flawed because it assumes that rates of change are commensurable across the evolutionary tree in absolute terms, and this is a mistake.

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