Genetic Future

Archives for February, 2009

Steve Murphy is up in arms about a recent email from 23andMe to its customers advertising the use of genetic variants on its V2 chip to predict individual risk of statin-induced myopathy and breast cancer. Of course, Steve does have a strong financial interest in 23andMe staying as far away as possible from the area…

Small delays due to Big Genetics

[Added in edit in response to concerned emails: The original title was deliberately provocative, and contrary to the message in the text; I apologise for any misunderstanding. I've largely rewritten the post to make my point more clearly.] One of the curious and paradoxical effects of Big Genetics projects like the 1000 Genomes Project –…

In a comment on my previous post, Tera Eerkes is skeptical about the utility of routinely performing whole-genome sequencing on newborns: I found this comment absolutely fascinating, given the recent reports on translational analysis, that indicate an actual lack of clinical utility of KRAS testing and other drug-gene interactions. I believe these reports are indicative…

I’m slowly catching up on genomics news from the last week – this story in particular has been getting a lot of press. The executive summary: Jay Flatley, CEO of genomic technology manufacturer Illumina, predicts that whole-genome sequencing of newborns will become routine within a decade. Flatley has an obvious financial interest in this prediction…

I wrote last week about the dramatic presentation here at  AGBT by Clifford Reid, CEO of new DNA sequencing company Complete Genomics. Reid made grand promises – entire human genome sequencing for $5000 available this year, and the sequencing of a million complete human genomes within the next five years – and presented some impressive…

I’ll be uploading a few of what I saw as the highlights from the AGBT meeting over the next week or so, as I go over my notes – you can also browse over Anthony Fejes‘ blog for live-blogging of many of the sessions. In no particular order, here are some of the tid-bits gleaned…

Calling all Navigenics customers

Katherine Kelly is a molecular biology major at Princeton University currently writing her senior thesis on personal genome services. As part of her research she would like to interview customers of 23andMe and Navigenics about their experiences of the personal genomics process. The problem: although she can find plenty of 23andMe customers, she is yet…

Nonsense in the human genome

Just a quick pointer to a new paper in American Journal of Human Genetics with my office-mate Bryndis Yngvadottir as lead author, which I see has already received some well-deserved coverage from ScienceDaily and GenomeWeb Daily News. The paper shows that specific types of genetic variants that inactivate genes – called nonsense SNPs – are…

Regular readers will know that I’m at the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting this week, one of the most highly-awaited meetings on the genomics calendar. There’s a huge amount of fascinating data being presented (anyone interested in a blow-by-blow account should follow Anthony Fejes’ live-blogging), but there’s definitely an overarching theme: the…

What a difference two days makes

The view from my back door in Cambridge on Monday: The view from my hotel balcony in Marco Island this afternoon: Subscribe to Genetic Future.