Genetic Future

Archives for June, 2009

Pharmacogenetics Reporter has a lengthy article (subscription required) on the California bill SB 482, sponsored by personal genomics company 23andMe, which seeks “to distinguish so-called “post-CLIA bioinformatics services” from entities providing laboratory services”. In other words, 23andMe is pushing to have companies purely providing analysis of genetic data regulated separately from those doing the actual laboratory testing.…

GenomeWeb reports that the advocacy group Genetic Alliance is lobbying the FDA for the construction of a public registry of genetic tests: [Genetic Alliance Director of Genetics and Health Policy Kristi] Zonno said FDA should create a public registry for genetic tests to “enable transparency and promote informed decision making for consumers and providers.” She…

Geoff Brumfiel has done a great job in this article for Nature News on the promise and perils of conference blogging. On the promise side there is discussion of the wildly successful FriendFeed coverage of last year’s ISMB meeting, which ended up being aggregated into a journal article; in the perilous direction, I get a…

Update: In the comments below, SNPedia co-founder Michael Cariaso notes that Duncan has already lost his crown to the anonymous European NA07022, recently sequenced by Complete Genomics, who weighs in with 5891 associations to Duncan’s 5321. Records don’t last long in the age of high-throughput genomics! Author David Ewing Duncan now officially has the most annotated genome of any human…

Added in edit: the original version of this post implied that the Nature editorial was recent, when it was in fact published in February this year; I was sent a link to it today and assumed it was new. I’ve edited the post to reflect this. One of the major reasons for concern from presenters…

Misha Angrist points me to the launch of TruGenetics, which basically looks like just another genome scan company with a unique gimmick: they’re giving 10,000 scans away free. What’s the business model here? The registration page provides some hints: Your questionnaire responses and genetic information will be used for genetic research. One of the main…

Readers who haven’t seen it already may be interested in the post and subsequent discussion on conference blogging taking place on Dr Isis’ blog. I feel that Dr Isis’ post misrepresents my position in several ways (see this clarifying comment from me), but she does provide an interesting argument against the notion that “open tweeting”…

The rather contentious result of my live-blogging of the Biology of Genomes meeting last month made it very clear to me that the scientific community needs to do a better job of communicating in advance whether a presentation is off-limits to audience live-bloggers. I’ve since been involved in a number of discussions about this issue both…

Emily Singer has been doing a great job of covering the consumer genetics beat over at Technology Review; her most recent piece draws on a recent presentation by former head of the National Human Genome Research Institute Francis Collins. Collins caused a bit of a stir during his presentation (at last week’s Consumer Genetics Show…

Regular readers will be aware that my last attempt to report on the presentations at last month’s Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Biology of Genomes meeting resulted in some controversy, as well as some fruitful (if sometimes heated) discussion on the topic of conference blogging. My next attempt will likely prove less divisive: I was kindly…