Genetic Future

Archives for July, 2009

Purcell et al. (2009). Common polygenic variation contributes to risk of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder Nature DOI: 10.1038/nature08185 Neil Walker has been doing a spectacular job of serving up useful information in the comments recently, so I asked him to write the first ever guest post on Genetic Future – something that (as I will…

A quick pointer to a new blog on the genomics scene that’s just been officially launched: Genomics Law Report, a corporate blog from legal firm Robinson, Bradshaw and Hinson. One of the contributors, Dan Vorhaus, is an advisor to the Personal Genome Project and provides one of the highest signal-to-noise ratio genomics feeds on Twitter.…

I just received the following email from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics – I’d recommend anyone interested in the future of personalised medicine in the UK consider submitting their views to the inquiry. I’ll be putting together my own submission, which I’ll also post here on Genetic Future. Medical profiling and online medicine: the ethics…

Personal genomics company 23andMe has always differentiated itself from its more sober competitors through an emphasis on collaborative, consumer-driven research – essentially, encouraging its customers to contribute their genetic and trait data to internal research projects designed to find new genetic associations. It is widely believed that generating novel associations between genetic variants and traits…

The UK House of Lords Science and Technology Committee has published the long-awaited report (PDF) from its inquiry into genomic medicine. Mark Henderson at The Times has been busy today, putting out three excellent pieces on the report: a summary of the major implications, an opinion piece pushing the need for the health service to…

A while back I pondered the possibility of creating icons for conference presenters to add to their first slide to alert bloggers/tweeters in the audience about whether the presented data was “blog-safe”. This was provoked by a recent episode illustrating general confusion among bloggers (in this case, me) and scientists about the use of social…