Genetic Future

Archives for September, 2009

ScienceInsider reports that plans by the UK Border Agency to employ DNA and isotope testing to test the origins of asylum seekers are being met with outrage by scientists and refugee advocates. There’s not much information about the precise tests that will be employed, but what information has been made available has horrified a number…

In this final post of their three-part series, lawyers Daniel Vorhaus and Lawrence Moore of the superb blog Genomics Law Report analyse the legal repercussions of a personal genomics company going bankrupt. In part one of the series Vorhaus and Moore analysed the privacy policies of two representative personal genomics companies, while part two was a…

Kevin Davies from Bio-IT World has two interviews up today relevant to new DNA sequencing technologies. Firstly, there’s an excellent interview with Clive Brown, vice president of development and informatics for Oxford Nanopore Technologies – one of the most promising contenders in the rapidly evolving third-generation DNA sequencing market. Brown is renowned for his plain-speaking…

Mark Henderson’s interview with Anne Wojcicki, co-founder of personal genomics company 23andMe, is well worth a read. The big story is this: Wojcicki has floated the possibility of offering discounted genome scans to clinicians “to teach them to interpret genomic information that is now readily available to their patients”. Wojcicki explains:

In the second of three guest posts, lawyers Daniel Vorhaus and Lawrence Moore of the superb blog Genomics Law Report discuss the implications for personal genomics customers if their provider goes bankrupt. In part one of the series (posted yesterday), Vorhaus and Moore dissected the implications of the privacy policies of two personal genomics companies, TruGenetics…

In this series of three guest posts, lawyers Daniel Vorhaus and Lawrence Moore of the excellent Genomics Law Report provide insight into the intriguing question of what happens to customers’ genetic data in the event that a personal genomics company goes out of business. Part II and III of this series will be posted over…

My esteemed blogging colleague Ginny Hughes will be presenting at next week’s Cold Spring Harbor Personal Genomes meeting (which I, sadly, will not be attending) on genetic testing for psychiatric diseases. As part of preparing for this she’d like to get a sense of the level of interest in this type of testing. If you…

David Clark at Genomics Law Report has a thorough dissection of the recent and highly restrictive laws passed in Germany governing access to genetic testing. You should read the whole thing to get a sense of what happens when governments grab the wrong end of the regulation stick, but here’s the crucial paragraph: The German…

The NY Times has an article entitled “Buyer beware of home DNA tests” that adopts the paternalistic party line of the medical establishment: taking DNA tests without a doctor’s advice is hazardous to your health. Remarkably, the article acknowledges that qualified genetic counsellors are few and far between and that “most practicing physicians lack the…

Sequencing giant Illumina has announced that it has delivered its first commercial personal genome sequence. The sequence was generated by the genome sequencing service launched by Illumina back in June, and was delivered in collaboration with new personal genomics company Pathway Genomics. Illumina’s genome sequencing service costs $48,000, and its first customer was entrepreneur Hermann…