Genetic Future

Archives for October, 2009

A while back Dan Vorhaus and Lawrence Moore wrote a fantastic series of guest posts here on Genetic Future on the issue of what would happen to customer data in the event that a direct-to-consumer genetic testing company went bankrupt – here’s the introduction, a detailed analysis of the implications of bankruptcy law, and a…

It’s been an intensive week of genomics here at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting, and I haven’t been able to grab time to blog as much as I’d have liked. In fact there’s a whole load of genomics news I’ll be trying to cover in some detail over the next couple of weeks;…

I’ll be away for the American Society of Human Genetics meeting in Hawaii for most of the next couple of weeks – I’ll be covering the conference primarily via Twitter, and you can follow all of the tweets from the conference using the #ASHG2009 hashtag. Genetics bloggers/tweeters should also pencil in the “tweetup” on Thursday…

Details are pretty sketchy, but a press release announced today suggests that personal genomics company 23andMe has performed a genome-wide association study comparing 100 current or former professional NFL players with a set of controls of unspecified sample size. The shocking result: The study did not find the tested players to be genetic outliers, suggesting…

Four scientists – including the omnipresent J. Craig Venter (left) – have penned an opinion piece in the latest issue of Nature based results from five individuals genotyped by two separate personal genomics companies. The article highlights some deficiencies in the way that genetic data are currently used by direct-to-consumer companies to generate risk predictions and…

The latest issue of Nature contains an embarrassment of riches for those of us interested in personal genomics, and indeed I’m having trouble figuring out which article to write about first. Just look at the options: there’s a review on approaches to tracking down the missing heritability of common diseases; there’s a potentially highly controversial plea…

IBM’s announcement that it will be entering the DNA sequencing technology race (which I mentioned briefly earlier today) has created a tremendous amount of mainstream media interest. That’s understandable given IBM’s size and history of innovation, but how likely are they to represent serious contenders for the potentially lucrative sequencing market? Firstly, it’s important to…

News in genomics

Things are as usual moving at ludicrous speed in the world of genomics, but sadly I only have time to post a few pointers to some of the most striking developments. IBM is moving into the third-generation sequencing arena. The company is developing a new sequencing technology based on tiny nanopores – a field already…

Last week I noted a highly controversial plan by the UK Border Agency to begin using DNA and isotope testing to help determine the geographical origins of refugees, for use in making decisions about whether or not to grant asylum.  A reader has just pointed me to this recent post on ScienceInsider indicating an apparent…