23andme

Genetic Future

Category archives for 23andme

The end is nigh for 23andMe?

Over at Gene Expression, Razib suggests that trouble lies ahead for personal genomics company 23andMe. Although I’m generally a bit of a cheerleader for the Mountain View-based startup, I must admit the signs over the past year or so haven’t been good: two rounds of lay-offs, the departure of co-founder Linda Avey, and the apparent deployment…

I’m currently playing around with my 23andMe data in the deCODEme browser.  deCODEme’s (apparently new?) Relationship Check feature, which appears to be a targeted version of 23andMe’s Relative Finder algorithm, allows users to compare their genetic data to other profiles in the database and calculate the probability of a familial relationship.  My comparison with notoriously…

Late last week I noted an intriguing offer by personal genomics company deCODEme: customers of rival genome scan provider 23andMe can now upload and analyse their 23andMe data through the deCODEme pipeline.  On the face of it that’s a fairly surprising offer. As I noted in my previous post, interpretation is what generates the real…

A curious tweet this morning from personal genomics company deCODEme, barely a few weeks after the declaration of formal bankruptcy of parent company deCODE Genetics: @decodegenetics: Migrate to deCODE this winter! Upload your genetic data for free. http://www.decodeme.com/data-upload Here’s a description of the service from the URL in the tweet: deCODEme wants to give even…

Added in edit: for superb analysis of the announcement from multiple angles, you should also check out Dan Vorhaus’ three incisive articles on Genomics Law Report. Personal genomics company 23andMe announced yesterday on its blog (and in an email to customers) of impending changes to its product line. Until now 23andMe has offered only two products: its…

Medland et al. (2009). Common Variants in the Trichohyalin Gene Are Associated with Straight Hair in Europeans. The American Journal of Human Genetics DOI: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.10.009 A couple of weeks ago I reported on a presentation by 23andMe‘s Nick Eriksson at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting in Honolulu, in which Eriksson presented data on a…

It’s been an intensive week of genomics here at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting, and I haven’t been able to grab time to blog as much as I’d have liked. In fact there’s a whole load of genomics news I’ll be trying to cover in some detail over the next couple of weeks;…

I’ll be away for the American Society of Human Genetics meeting in Hawaii for most of the next couple of weeks – I’ll be covering the conference primarily via Twitter, and you can follow all of the tweets from the conference using the #ASHG2009 hashtag. Genetics bloggers/tweeters should also pencil in the “tweetup” on Thursday…

Details are pretty sketchy, but a press release announced today suggests that personal genomics company 23andMe has performed a genome-wide association study comparing 100 current or former professional NFL players with a set of controls of unspecified sample size. The shocking result: The study did not find the tested players to be genetic outliers, suggesting…

Four scientists – including the omnipresent J. Craig Venter (left) – have penned an opinion piece in the latest issue of Nature based results from five individuals genotyped by two separate personal genomics companies. The article highlights some deficiencies in the way that genetic data are currently used by direct-to-consumer companies to generate risk predictions and…