23andme

Genetic Future

Category archives for 23andme

Mark Henderson’s interview with Anne Wojcicki, co-founder of personal genomics company 23andMe, is well worth a read. The big story is this: Wojcicki has floated the possibility of offering discounted genome scans to clinicians “to teach them to interpret genomic information that is now readily available to their patients”. Wojcicki explains:

In the second of three guest posts, lawyers Daniel Vorhaus and Lawrence Moore of the superb blog Genomics Law Report discuss the implications for personal genomics customers if their provider goes bankrupt. In part one of the series (posted yesterday), Vorhaus and Moore dissected the implications of the privacy policies of two personal genomics companies, TruGenetics…

A tweet from personal genomics company 23andMe (see screenshot below) sparked my interest: I knew 23andMe had been successful in recruiting Parkinsons patients as part of its targeted drive, and the 337 unspecified “patients” are the product of their broader recruitment drive for diseased genomes, Research Revolution (which I’ve dissected in a previous post) –…

Those interested in the commercial, technical or ethical issues around the emerging industry of personal genomics now have a chance to put their questions to the co-founder of 23andMe, Anne Wojcicki. The NY Times blog Freakonomics is inviting readers to add their questions to the comments section of this post; Wojcicki will respond in a…

Personal genomics company 23andMe has always differentiated itself from its more sober competitors through an emphasis on collaborative, consumer-driven research – essentially, encouraging its customers to contribute their genetic and trait data to internal research projects designed to find new genetic associations. It is widely believed that generating novel associations between genetic variants and traits…

Pharmacogenetics Reporter has a lengthy article (subscription required) on the California bill SB 482, sponsored by personal genomics company 23andMe, which seeks “to distinguish so-called “post-CLIA bioinformatics services” from entities providing laboratory services”. In other words, 23andMe is pushing to have companies purely providing analysis of genetic data regulated separately from those doing the actual laboratory testing.…

I’ve stumbled rather late across a very promising new blog on the experience of a consumer genomics customer, Fantastic Voyage. The blog is primarily written by Grant Wood, the senior IT strategist for a clinical genetics institute in Salt Lake City; the premise of the blog is that Wood will discuss his own experience of…

The buzz leading up to this week’s Consumer Genetics Show in Boston suggested that a major announcement would be made by the CEO of genomics technology provider Illumina, Jay Flatley. Illumina provides the most popular second-generation sequencing instrument currently on the market, the Genome Analyzer II, and has been making noises about moving into the…

A reader has pointed me to the latest issue of the American Journal of Bioethics, which is devoted to social networking and personal genomics. I’m still working my way through the many interesting articles, but for now I wanted to cover some useful points in the editorial (entitled “A Pragmatic Consideration of Ethical Issues Relating…

This seems like pretty interesting news: 23andMe, Inc., an industry leader in personal genetics, and Palomar Pomerado Health (PPH), the largest public health district in California, today announced that PPH will be offering the 23andMe Personal Genome Service for sale to San Diegans at its outpatient health centers. As an innovator in preventive health care,…