big genetics

Genetic Future

Category archives for big genetics

In the comments to a previous post defending big genetics, Andro Hsu relates an anecdote that warrants repeating: IIRC, at the December NIH/CDC meeting Francis Collins suggested that the way to get to the bottom of the missing heritability, the common disease common variant hypothesis, gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, etc. etc. is to run a population-wide,…

Over at Gene Expression, p-ter has a post up defending the “big genetics” approach, noting that large-scale hypothesis-free genetics studies have consistently yielded important results for follow-up detailed fine-scale studies. It’s a sound argument. I’ve argued in the past that many of the fears expressed about Big Genetics are overblown:

David Dooling has a great post that starts with the conference blogging issue, and then leaps off in a different but related direction – the curious double standard in the data release policies applying to large genome sequencing centres compared to other genomic researchers. As David notes, the advent of second-generation sequencing technologies means that…

Small delays due to Big Genetics

[Added in edit in response to concerned emails: The original title was deliberately provocative, and contrary to the message in the text; I apologise for any misunderstanding. I’ve largely rewritten the post to make my point more clearly.] One of the curious and paradoxical effects of Big Genetics projects like the 1000 Genomes Project –…

Olivia Judson’s blog has a guest post by Aaron Hirsh that got me thinking about a topic that will be familiar to most scientists: the transition of research towards Big Science. Big Science basically includes any project involving a large consortium of research groups working together on a tightly-defined problem, usually with a very specific…

This will probably only be of interest to population genetics afficianados, but I just noticed that the HapMap project has made its phase 3 data available through its browser (the data were previously available for download, but are much more accessible – especially to non-bioinformaticians – through the browser interface). The HapMap project is a…

Nature News has a special feature on “big data” – a broad look at the demands of the brave new world of massively high-throughput data generation, and the solutions adopted by research institutes and corporations to deal with those demands. The image to the left (from an article in the feature by Boing Boing‘s Cory…