commercial genetic testing

Genetic Future

Category archives for commercial genetic testing

As part of his Gene Week celebration over at Forbes, Matthew Herper has a provocative post titled “Why you can’t have your $1000 genome“. In this post I’ll explain why, while Herper’s pessimism is absolutely justified for genomes produced in a medical setting, I’m confident that I’ll be obtaining my own near-$1000 genome in the…

(This is an edited excerpt from an op-ed piece I just wrote for Xconomy, posted here as I think it provides some nuance on my views on regulation of genetic testing that was lacking from my post last week. Some context for new readers: a Congressional investigation into the direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing industry last…

The brief Golden Age of direct-to-consumer genetic testing – in which people could freely gain access to their own genetic information without a doctor’s permission – may be about to draw to a close. In a dramatic week, announcements of investigations into direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies by both the FDA and the US Congress have…

Update: Dan Vorhaus has a brilliantly thorough post outlining the implications of the registry. NIH Director Francis Collins has announced the creation of a voluntary registry for genetic testing services, with the details of each service being made fully available in a public database. Much depends on the details, but if this database is done…

The end is nigh for 23andMe?

Over at Gene Expression, Razib suggests that trouble lies ahead for personal genomics company 23andMe. Although I’m generally a bit of a cheerleader for the Mountain View-based startup, I must admit the signs over the past year or so haven’t been good: two rounds of lay-offs, the departure of co-founder Linda Avey, and the apparent deployment…

This piece in Newsweek is a neat summary of the rise and fall of Icelandic genomics giant deCODE Genetics. Regular readers of Genetic Future will be aware that the company has been steadily bleeding capital ever since its launch over a decade ago, and recently declared formal bankruptcy. Since then the company has been bought…

Disclaimer: my wife and I have both received and used free testing kits from Counsyl. Counsyl is a rather enigmatic player in the personal genomics field: apart from a brief mention in Steven Pinker’s excellent NY Times piece over a year ago and an even briefer post on a Newsweek blog late last year, the…

A curious tweet this morning from personal genomics company deCODEme, barely a few weeks after the declaration of formal bankruptcy of parent company deCODE Genetics: @decodegenetics: Migrate to deCODE this winter! Upload your genetic data for free. http://www.decodeme.com/data-upload Here’s a description of the service from the URL in the tweet: deCODEme wants to give even…

Four scientists – including the omnipresent J. Craig Venter (left) – have penned an opinion piece in the latest issue of Nature based results from five individuals genotyped by two separate personal genomics companies. The article highlights some deficiencies in the way that genetic data are currently used by direct-to-consumer companies to generate risk predictions and…

In the second of three guest posts, lawyers Daniel Vorhaus and Lawrence Moore of the superb blog Genomics Law Report discuss the implications for personal genomics customers if their provider goes bankrupt. In part one of the series (posted yesterday), Vorhaus and Moore dissected the implications of the privacy policies of two personal genomics companies, TruGenetics…