conference blogging

Genetic Future

Category archives for conference blogging

I’ve been quiet for the last two weeks, largely due to some feverish last-minute analysis in the lead-up to this year’s Biology of Genomes meeting at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, where I spoke in (and co-chaired) the Genetics of Complex Traits session. Long-term readers may recall that I sparked off a minor controversy at last…

The main theme of this year’s Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting should come as no surprise to regular readers: sequencing. Generating as many bases of DNA sequence as quickly, cheaply and accurately as possible is the goal of the moment, and the number of companies jostling to achieve that goal is growing rapidly.…

Stephen Turner from Pacific Biosciences gave a dramatic presentation this afternoon launching PacBio’s new third-generation sequencing instrument. The room was packed for the seminar, with a palpable buzz, and Turner’s presentation was preceded by a theatrical introduction from PacBio CEO Hugh Martin.  The crescendo of Turner’s presentation was the unveiling of a video showing the…

Belated news from AGBT

I’ve been remiss in blogging from the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting here in Marco Island, Florida, primarily due to some panic-stricken last-minute changes to the slides for my own presentation last night. Fortunately the conference has been extremely well-covered by others: Sanger colleague Luke Jostins has blog posts up summarising day 1…

I’ll be at the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting in Marco Island, Florida for the next week, soaking up sun and genomics, keeping my eye out for the anticipated major announcements from sequencing companies and researchers, and quietly panicking about my presentation on Thursday. You’ll hear more about the meeting from me and…

I’ll be away for the American Society of Human Genetics meeting in Hawaii for most of the next couple of weeks – I’ll be covering the conference primarily via Twitter, and you can follow all of the tweets from the conference using the #ASHG2009 hashtag. Genetics bloggers/tweeters should also pencil in the “tweetup” on Thursday…

A while back I pondered the possibility of creating icons for conference presenters to add to their first slide to alert bloggers/tweeters in the audience about whether the presented data was “blog-safe”. This was provoked by a recent episode illustrating general confusion among bloggers (in this case, me) and scientists about the use of social…

Geoff Brumfiel has done a great job in this article for Nature News on the promise and perils of conference blogging. On the promise side there is discussion of the wildly successful FriendFeed coverage of last year’s ISMB meeting, which ended up being aggregated into a journal article; in the perilous direction, I get a…

Added in edit: the original version of this post implied that the Nature editorial was recent, when it was in fact published in February this year; I was sent a link to it today and assumed it was new. I’ve edited the post to reflect this. One of the major reasons for concern from presenters…

Readers who haven’t seen it already may be interested in the post and subsequent discussion on conference blogging taking place on Dr Isis’ blog. I feel that Dr Isis’ post misrepresents my position in several ways (see this clarifying comment from me), but she does provide an interesting argument against the notion that “open tweeting”…