decodeme

Genetic Future

Category archives for decodeme

The buzz leading up to this week’s Consumer Genetics Show in Boston suggested that a major announcement would be made by the CEO of genomics technology provider Illumina, Jay Flatley. Illumina provides the most popular second-generation sequencing instrument currently on the market, the Genome Analyzer II, and has been making noises about moving into the…

I noted yesterday that the annual earnings report of Icelandic biotech giant deCODE Genetics, one of the major players in modern human genetics, suggested that the company is veering steadily towards financial oblivion.¬† Today¬†the company had a crucial earnings call – anyone interested in the details of deCODE’s plight, or at least a sanitised corporate…

Personalised medicine pioneers Helix Health have announced their intention to seize control of the assets of personal genomics company 23andMe. Helix Health founder Steve Murphy (left) laid out his takeover plans during a press conference this morning. “It’s time to seize the moral high ground!!!!” he proclaimed, physically spelling out the additional exclamation marks to…

deCODE Genetics, the major Icelandic biotech company behind personal genomics outfit deCODEme, has just released its financial results for 2008. Things really aren’t looking good: At December 31, 2008, the company had liquid funds available for operating activities, comprised of cash and cash equivalents together with current investments, of $3.7 million, compared to $64.2 million…

New Scientist has a fascinating piece in which reporters Peter Aldhous and Michael Reilly demonstrate – with a little cash, and more than a little effort – the possibility of obtaining large-scale genetic data from someone without their knowledge or permission. The reporters started with a glass that Aldhous had drunk water from; Reilly swabbed…

Genetic genealogist Blaine Bettinger explores the results of his ancestry testing from 23andMe, and compares it to previous results from a much lower-resolution test. The main message: the hundreds of thousands of genetic markers used by 23andMe (and other personal genomics companies, e.g. deCODEme) to infer genetic ancestry  provide a much more detailed and accurate…

deCODE now licensed in California

Icelandic genomics company deCODE Genetics has received a license to market direct-to-consumer genetic tests (such as the genome scan provided by daughter company deCODEme) in the state of California. This follows the regulatory crackdown by California’s public health department last June, which sent nervous ripples through the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry. Personal genomics rivals 23andMe…

I’ll be uploading a few of what I saw as the highlights from the AGBT meeting over the next week or so, as I go over my notes – you can also browse over Anthony Fejes‘ blog for live-blogging of many of the sessions. In no particular order, here are some of the tid-bits gleaned…

Misha Angrist passes on a call from Case Western University for personal genomics customers to participate in a study of the experience of getting your genome scanned. If you’ve paid money to 23andMe, deCODEme or Navigenics, consider getting involved – Misha assures us that the process was relatively painless. By the way, if you happen…

Following the dramatic appearance of the field of personal genomics just over a year ago the major players in the field have worked hard to distinguish themselves from their competition: 23andMe has emphasised the intellectual joy of learning about genetics, and also attempted to actively engage its customers in the company’s research projects; deCODEme has…