direct-to-consumer genetic testing

Genetic Future

Category archives for direct-to-consumer genetic testing

Two days ago I reported a rumour that the FDA might have convinced genotyping chip provider Illumina to stop providing its products to direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies – a move that would effectively prevent these companies from being able to operate. The rumour seemed plausible at the time, based on two pieces of evidence. Firstly,…

(This is an edited excerpt from an op-ed piece I just wrote for Xconomy, posted here as I think it provides some nuance on my views on regulation of genetic testing that was lacking from my post last week. Some context for new readers: a Congressional investigation into the direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing industry last…

An excerpt from an article I co-wrote for Xconomy with Genomics Law Report‘s Dan Vorhaus – link to the full article below. Are you ready for consumer genetics? Is your government? Recent announcements of federal investigations into the budding direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing industry suggest that authorities are preparing to increase regulation of companies offering…

In October last year I reported on a presentation by direct-to-consumer genetic testing company 23andMe at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting in Honolulu, in which the company described results of genetic association studies performed using combined genetic and survey data from their customers. The results of their study include replication of several known…

Personal genomics company 23andMe has revealed that a lab mix-up resulted in as many as 96 customers receiving the wrong data. If you have a 23andMe account you can see the formal announcement of the problem here, and I’ve pasted the full text at the end of this post. It appears that a single 96-well…

The brief Golden Age of direct-to-consumer genetic testing – in which people could freely gain access to their own genetic information without a doctor’s permission – may be about to draw to a close. In a dramatic week, announcements of investigations into direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies by both the FDA and the US Congress have…

Camilla Long’s appallingly bad op-ed piece about personal genomics in the Sunday Times is a true masterpiece of unsupported criticism, and an ode to willful ignorance. I’d encourage readers to discover their own favourite errors and misconceptions (there are plenty to go around), but here are some of the more glaring flaws:

Disclaimer: my wife and I have both received and used free testing kits from Counsyl. Counsyl is a rather enigmatic player in the personal genomics field: apart from a brief mention in Steven Pinker’s excellent NY Times piece over a year ago and an even briefer post on a Newsweek blog late last year, the…

Genetic genealogist Blaine Bettinger has a fantastic post dissecting and contextualising a rather worrying result from his personal genomic analysis: a 50-60% increased lifetime risk of type 2 diabetes. Blaine is unfortunate enough to be among the 1-2% of individuals who carry two risky versions at each of three major risk variants for the disease.…

Late last week I noted an intriguing offer by personal genomics company deCODEme: customers of rival genome scan provider 23andMe can now upload and analyse their 23andMe data through the deCODEme pipeline.  On the face of it that’s a fairly surprising offer. As I noted in my previous post, interpretation is what generates the real…