evolutionary genetics

Genetic Future

Category archives for evolutionary genetics

Genetic complexity

Razib from Gene Expression has a frankly heroic post up dissecting a recent paper on genetic variation around the FUT2 gene, which encodes a cell surface protein involved in the pathway that produces the ABO blood group antigens. The story illustrates some of the difficulties associated with extracting information about human evolution from genetic sequence…

This is a profoundly impressive paper – a study of the patterns of genetic variation in 2,400 individuals from 113 African populations, by far the most comprehensive analysis of African genetic diversity ever performed.

Pickrell, J., Coop, G., Novembre, J., Kudaravalli, S., Li, J., Absher, D., Srinivasan, B., Barsh, G., Myers, R., Feldman, M., & Pritchard, J. (2009). Signals of recent positive selection in a worldwide sample of human populations Genome Research DOI: 10.1101/gr.087577.108 I pointed yesterday to a new paper in Genome Research taking a genome-wide look at…

I’ll hopefully have more time to write about this tomorrow, but for now I’ll simply suggest that you go and read the free full text PDF of this advance online manuscript in Genome Research. This is the most important recent paper in the field of human evolutionary genetics – a thorough and careful analysis of the…

Nonsense in the human genome

Just a quick pointer to a new paper in American Journal of Human Genetics with my office-mate Bryndis Yngvadottir as lead author, which I see has already received some well-deserved coverage from ScienceDaily and GenomeWeb Daily News. The paper shows that specific types of genetic variants that inactivate genes – called nonsense SNPs – are…

The genetic history of Iceland

Razib has an excellent discussion of a brand new paper in PLoS Genetics, which uses DNA samples from medieval Icelandic skeletons to explore the genetic history of the Icelandic population. This population is of course of great interest to human geneticists: the Icelandic company deCODE (the home of over half the authors on this paper)…

T. Hofer, N. Ray, D. Wegmann, L. Excoffier (2009). Large allele frequency differences between human continental groups are more likely to have occurred by drift during range expansions than by selection Annals of Human Genetics, 73 (1), 95-108 DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-1809.2008.00489.x I’ve just been reading over an article from late last year in the Annals of…