genomes unzipped

Genetic Future

Category archives for genomes unzipped

As part of his Gene Week celebration over at Forbes, Matthew Herper has a provocative post titled “Why you can’t have your $1000 genome“. In this post I’ll explain why, while Herper’s pessimism is absolutely justified for genomes produced in a medical setting, I’m confident that I’ll be obtaining my own near-$1000 genome in the…

Genomes Unzipped reader survey

A reminder to anyone who reads my other blog Genomes Unzipped that we have a reader survey underway there now, which includes some questions about genetic testing experiences and attitudes towards genetics. We’re closing the survey to responses this weekend, so if you’re an Unzipped reader but haven’t had a chance to fill in the survey,…

Back in June I launched a new blog, Genomes Unzipped, together with a group of colleagues and friends with expertise in various areas of genetics. At the time I made a rather cryptic comment about “planning much bigger things for the site over the next few months”. Today I announced what I meant by that:…

Oddities of the odds ratio

Over at Genomes Unzipped, my esteemed colleague Carl Anderson has his first ever blog post: an exploration of the various ways in which the effects of genetic variants on disease risk can vary from person to person.  This potential variation has been the cause of much angst among critics of the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry.…

(Cross-posted to Genomes Unzipped.) Today’s US Congress Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing into the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry was a vicious affair. Representatives from testing companies 23andMe, Navigenics and Pathway faced a barrage of questions about the accuracy and utility of their tests, made all the worse by the fact that many of the…

Every issue of Nature Genetics is packed full of them, and they’re the basis for the risk predictions offered by every personal genomics company – but how do you make sense of a genome-wide association study? How can you tell the difference between results you can trust and those you should treat with caution? Over…

The first ever post on the new group blog I announced yesterday, Genomes Unzipped, is now live: it’s Luke Jostins of Genetic Inference talking about the importance of sequencing for the future of personal genomics. Here’s a taste: There is a particular type of variation that genotype chips can never get at, the type of…

I’m pleased to announce the beta launch of a new group blog on personal genomics, Genomes Unzipped.  I’ve been working with a group of scientific colleagues and fellow bloggers on this project for quite a while now. Some of the group members will be familiar to regular readers: Dan Vorhaus from Genomics Law Report, Luke…