genome-wide association studies

Genetic Future

Category archives for genome-wide association studies

Every issue of Nature Genetics is packed full of them, and they’re the basis for the risk predictions offered by every personal genomics company – but how do you make sense of a genome-wide association study? How can you tell the difference between results you can trust and those you should treat with caution? Over…

As an addendum to my previous post on the controversial “longevity genes” study, you should go and check this out. It’s a post on the blog of personal genomics company 23andMe, and it’s a pretty impressive piece of scientific dissection of the longevity GWAS paper – in addition to detailing a variety of methodological problems with…

When an article was published in Science last week reporting that DNA samples from exceptionally long-lived individuals differed detectably from those of normal individuals, it got plenty of positive attention from the mainstream media. However, the buzz from experts was rapid and telling: my colleagues in the statistical genetics community weren’t excited about the results, but…

Kai Wang is a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Applied Genomics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and an author on numerous genome-wide association studies. He left this lengthy comment as a response to my recent post on this comment by McClellan and King in Cell, and I felt it warranted promotion to a full post…

This critique of genome-wide association studies by Jon McClellan and Mary-Claire King in Cell is the latest salvo in a prolonged backlash against genome-wide association studies (GWAS). I hope to have more on the McClellan and King paper shortly, but in the meantime I will point you to a positive take on the paper by…

Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. (2010). Genome-wide association study of CNVs in 16,000 cases of eight common diseases and 3,000 shared controls Nature, 464 (7289), 713-720 DOI: 10.1038/nature08979 The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium has just published the results of a massive survey of common, large DNA duplications and deletions (collectively termed copy number variation,…

Nic Wade says something very strange in his most recent article on whole genome sequencing in reference to the outcomes of genome-wide association studies: The results of this costly international exercise have been disappointing. About 2,000 sites on the human genome have been statistically linked with various diseases, but in many cases the sites are not inside…

Medland et al. (2009). Common Variants in the Trichohyalin Gene Are Associated with Straight Hair in Europeans. The American Journal of Human Genetics DOI: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.10.009 A couple of weeks ago I reported on a presentation by 23andMe‘s Nick Eriksson at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting in Honolulu, in which Eriksson presented data on a…

It’s been an intensive week of genomics here at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting, and I haven’t been able to grab time to blog as much as I’d have liked. In fact there’s a whole load of genomics news I’ll be trying to cover in some detail over the next couple of weeks;…

Details are pretty sketchy, but a press release announced today suggests that personal genomics company 23andMe has performed a genome-wide association study comparing 100 current or former professional NFL players with a set of controls of unspecified sample size. The shocking result: The study did not find the tested players to be genetic outliers, suggesting…