genome-wide association studies

Genetic Future

Category archives for genome-wide association studies

Purcell et al. (2009). Common polygenic variation contributes to risk of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder Nature DOI: 10.1038/nature08185 Neil Walker has been doing a spectacular job of serving up useful information in the comments recently, so I asked him to write the first ever guest post on Genetic Future – something that (as I will…

BioArray News (subscription required) reports that genomic analysis technology provider Illumina has launched a new family of genotyping chips designed to simultaneously assay 4 million sites of variation in the human genome.

A new paper in Nature reports the results of a large genome-wide association of autism. After some fairly heroic data analysis, the researchers have managed to tag one region of the genome as containing a common variant that contribute to the disease, with odds ratios on the order of 1.2 (the paper actually reports six…

Cho, Y., Go, M., Kim, Y., Heo, J., Oh, J., Ban, H., Yoon, D., Lee, M., Kim, D., Park, M., Cha, S., Kim, J., Han, B., Min, H., Ahn, Y., Park, M., Han, H., Jang, H., Cho, E., Lee, J., Cho, N., Shin, C., Park, T., Park, J., Lee, J., Cardon, L., Clarke, G., McCarthy,…

I wrote a few days ago about a debate in the New England Journal of Medicine over the value of data emerging from recent genome-wide studies of the role of genetic variation in common human diseases and other traits. David Goldstein argued that genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated disappointing results, and should be scaled…

The latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine has four excellent and thought-provoking articles on the recent revolution in the genetics of common disease and its implications for personalised medicine and personal genomics. Razib and Misha Angrist have already commented, and there’s also a thorough lay summary by Nick Wade in the NY Times. The scene…

Yurii S Aulchenko, Maksim V Struchalin, Nadezhda M Belonogova, Tatiana I Axenovich, Michael N Weedon, Albert Hofman, Andre G Uitterlinden, Manfred Kayser, Ben A Oostra, Cornelia M van Duijn, A Cecile J W Janssens, Pavel M Borodin (2009). Predicting human height by Victorian and genomic methods European Journal of Human Genetics DOI: 10.1038/ejhg.2009.5 Human height…

I’ll be uploading a few of what I saw as the highlights from the AGBT meeting over the next week or so, as I go over my notes – you can also browse over Anthony Fejes‘ blog for live-blogging of many of the sessions. In no particular order, here are some of the tid-bits gleaned…

Welcome to the 42nd edition of Gene Genie, the blog carnival of clinical genetics and personalised medicine. Most of the entries in this edition fall under the broad umbrella of personalised genetics, with posts emphasising both the pros and cons of the emerging consumer genetic testing industry. The promise and perils of personalised genetics Hsien-Hsien…

Well, it’s a little late, but I finally have a list of what I see as some of the major trends that will play out in the human genomics field in 2009 – both in terms of research outcomes, and shifts in the rapidly-evolving consumer genomics industry. For genetics-savvy readers a lot of these predictions…