knome

Genetic Future

Category archives for knome

The buzz leading up to this week’s Consumer Genetics Show in Boston suggested that a major announcement would be made by the CEO of genomics technology provider Illumina, Jay Flatley. Illumina provides the most popular second-generation sequencing instrument currently on the market, the Genome Analyzer II, and has been making noises about moving into the…

Personal genomics is a rapidly evolving game, with a clear end goal in sight: offering consumers an accurate, affordable and complete genome sequence, and providing them with tools to dig out the useful nuggets of information contained therein. That goal remains out of reach, and while DNA sequencing technology continues to mature companies in the…

A couple of weeks ago I reported that personal genome sequencing company Knome had launched a publicity stunt: selling a complete genome sequence on eBay. I argued that the current information content in a human genome doesn’t come anywhere near justifying that cost for most of us, although it could potentially be worthwhile for patients…

Personal genome sequencing provider Knome is planning to offer a complete genome sequence to the highest bidder on eBay – with the bidding opening at $68,000. The plan, announced in an NY Times article today, is described as “essentially a publicity stunt” – the proceeds will be donated to the X Prize Foundation, a charitable…

Following the dramatic appearance of the field of personal genomics just over a year ago the major players in the field have worked hard to distinguish themselves from their competition: 23andMe has emphasised the intellectual joy of learning about genetics, and also attempted to actively engage its customers in the company’s research projects; deCODEme has…

Nature has a list of the top news stories of 2008, and “Personal genomics goes mainstream” comes up second: In January, an international consortium announced the launch of the 1,000 Genomes Project, which aims to provide a catalogue of human genetic variation. In October, the Personal Genome Project, which hopes to sequence and publish the…

This little USB drive represents the current pinnacle of luxury personal genomics. It’s the product of Knome (pronounced “know me”), a Cambridge, MA-based biotech start-up fronted by genomics pioneer George Church (recently profiled in Wired). In return for $350,000, Knome’s customers receive a shiny 8 Gb drive containing their entire genome sequence (or rather, a…