open science

Genetic Future

Category archives for open science

As part of his Gene Week celebration over at Forbes, Matthew Herper has a provocative post titled “Why you can’t have your $1000 genome“. In this post I’ll explain why, while Herper’s pessimism is absolutely justified for genomes produced in a medical setting, I’m confident that I’ll be obtaining my own near-$1000 genome in the…

Back in June I launched a new blog, Genomes Unzipped, together with a group of colleagues and friends with expertise in various areas of genetics. At the time I made a rather cryptic comment about “planning much bigger things for the site over the next few months”. Today I announced what I meant by that:…

European Genetics and Anthropology has a neat little tutorial that may be of interest for genetic hobbyists: it provides instructions on how to run the program STRUCTURE on your own genetic data generated by a personal genomics company such as 23andMe or deCODEme.  STRUCTURE is an extremely popular tool among researchers working in population genetics,…

David Dooling has a great post that starts with the conference blogging issue, and then leaps off in a different but related direction – the curious double standard in the data release policies applying to large genome sequencing centres compared to other genomic researchers. As David notes, the advent of second-generation sequencing technologies means that…