participant-driven research

Genetic Future

Category archives for participant-driven research

Back in June I launched a new blog, Genomes Unzipped, together with a group of colleagues and friends with expertise in various areas of genetics. At the time I made a rather cryptic comment about “planning much bigger things for the site over the next few months”. Today I announced what I meant by that:…

A short but glorious rant

Misha Angrist has a very brief but eloquent rant in response to the genomics nay-sayers in this Nature News piece on the bankruptcy of deCODE Genetics. Here’s a taste: I agree: GWAS is of limited value and this probably contributed to deCODE’s demise. But whatever deCODE’s fate, if whole human genomes can be sequenced for…

It’s been an intensive week of genomics here at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting, and I haven’t been able to grab time to blog as much as I’d have liked. In fact there’s a whole load of genomics news I’ll be trying to cover in some detail over the next couple of weeks;…

A tweet from personal genomics company 23andMe (see screenshot below) sparked my interest: I knew 23andMe had been successful in recruiting Parkinsons patients as part of its targeted drive, and the 337 unspecified “patients” are the product of their broader recruitment drive for diseased genomes, Research Revolution (which I’ve dissected in a previous post) –…

Over at the 23andMe blog The Spittoon, company co-founder Linda Avey expands on her vision for a novel model of genomic research, in which personal genomics customers contribute their genetic and health data to fuel research into the inherited and environmental triggers for disease. This is a model that 23andMe has been building towards for…