personal genome project

Genetic Future

Category archives for personal genome project

Back in June I launched a new blog, Genomes Unzipped, together with a group of colleagues and friends with expertise in various areas of genetics. At the time I made a rather cryptic comment about “planning much bigger things for the site over the next few months”. Today I announced what I meant by that:…

The Personal Genome Project, an initiative founded by George Church that ultimately seeks to sequence the complete genomes of 100,000 people, has called for the next wave of volunteers. The PGP will sequence your genome and give you back the data for the bargain-basement price of zero dollars (not bad compared to the $68,000 that…

Look into the eyes of the PGP-10

Emily Singer has a fantastic article in MIT’s Technology Review reviewing the current state of play in human genomics. A curious highlight for me was this panel of mug-shots from the PGP-10, the 10 high-profile volunteers currently having their genomes sequenced as part of the Personal Genome Project: Top row from left: Misha Angrist, Keith…

PGP sequence data disappointing

The promise of release of raw sequence data files from the first 10 Personal Genome Project volunteers certainly caused a media stir (see the round-up by the PGP’s own Jason Bobe), but the actual released data are pretty underwhelming. So far raw sequence data files have been posted on the PGP profile sites of only…

The first 10 participants of the ground-breaking Personal Genome Project (PGP) will be receiving a hefty chunk of data today: the sequence of the protein-coding regions from many of their genes (collectively known as the “exome”). And if all goes according to plan, they’ll soon be dumping all of that data on the web for…