personal genomics

Genetic Future

Category archives for personal genomics

As part of his Gene Week celebration over at Forbes, Matthew Herper has a provocative post titled “Why you can’t have your $1000 genome“. In this post I’ll explain why, while Herper’s pessimism is absolutely justified for genomes produced in a medical setting, I’m confident that I’ll be obtaining my own near-$1000 genome in the…

Update 30/11/10: 23andMe has extended their 80% discount until Christmas, without a need for a discount code. Personal genomics company 23andMe has made some fairly major announcements this week: a brand new chip, a new product strategy (including a monthly subscription fee), and yet another discount push. What do these changes mean for existing and new…

Two days ago I reported a rumour that the FDA might have convinced genotyping chip provider Illumina to stop providing its products to direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies – a move that would effectively prevent these companies from being able to operate. The rumour seemed plausible at the time, based on two pieces of evidence. Firstly,…

Following up on the rumours I posted about yesterday regarding a potential bid by the FDA to choke of direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies’ supply of genotyping chips, I received the following statement by email from 23andMe’s PR firm: 23andMe is engaged in an ongoing process with the FDA. 23andMe understands that Illumina is also engaged…

Personal genomics links

This week was pretty hectic, so there were plenty of useful or interesting links from the personal genomics world that I didn’t have time to write about in detail. Feel free to share your own suggestions in the comments. Responses to the Congress/FDA crack-downAs all of you will be aware, the big news this week…

(This is an edited excerpt from an op-ed piece I just wrote for Xconomy, posted here as I think it provides some nuance on my views on regulation of genetic testing that was lacking from my post last week. Some context for new readers: a Congressional investigation into the direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing industry last…

(Cross-posted to Genomes Unzipped.) Today’s US Congress Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing into the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry was a vicious affair. Representatives from testing companies 23andMe, Navigenics and Pathway faced a barrage of questions about the accuracy and utility of their tests, made all the worse by the fact that many of the…

I mentioned last week on Genetic Future that a reporter with the Washington Post, Rob Stein, had emailed the National Society of Genetic Counsellors to search specifically for people with negative experiences of personal genomics for an upcoming article on the industry. At the time I called for personal genomics customers with positive experiences to…

The first ever post on the new group blog I announced yesterday, Genomes Unzipped, is now live: it’s Luke Jostins of Genetic Inference talking about the importance of sequencing for the future of personal genomics. Here’s a taste: There is a particular type of variation that genotype chips can never get at, the type of…

I’m pleased to announce the beta launch of a new group blog on personal genomics, Genomes Unzipped.  I’ve been working with a group of scientific colleagues and fellow bloggers on this project for quite a while now. Some of the group members will be familiar to regular readers: Dan Vorhaus from Genomics Law Report, Luke…