personal genomics

Genetic Future

Category archives for personal genomics

Medland et al. (2009). Common Variants in the Trichohyalin Gene Are Associated with Straight Hair in Europeans. The American Journal of Human Genetics DOI: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.10.009 A couple of weeks ago I reported on a presentation by 23andMe‘s Nick Eriksson at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting in Honolulu, in which Eriksson presented data on a…

It’s been an intensive week of genomics here at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting, and I haven’t been able to grab time to blog as much as I’d have liked. In fact there’s a whole load of genomics news I’ll be trying to cover in some detail over the next couple of weeks;…

Details are pretty sketchy, but a press release announced today suggests that personal genomics company 23andMe has performed a genome-wide association study comparing 100 current or former professional NFL players with a set of controls of unspecified sample size. The shocking result: The study did not find the tested players to be genetic outliers, suggesting…

Four scientists – including the omnipresent J. Craig Venter (left) – have penned an opinion piece in the latest issue of Nature based results from five individuals genotyped by two separate personal genomics companies. The article highlights some deficiencies in the way that genetic data are currently used by direct-to-consumer companies to generate risk predictions and…

Mark Henderson’s interview with Anne Wojcicki, co-founder of personal genomics company 23andMe, is well worth a read. The big story is this: Wojcicki has floated the possibility of offering discounted genome scans to clinicians “to teach them to interpret genomic information that is now readily available to their patients”. Wojcicki explains:

In the second of three guest posts, lawyers Daniel Vorhaus and Lawrence Moore of the superb blog Genomics Law Report discuss the implications for personal genomics customers if their provider goes bankrupt. In part one of the series (posted yesterday), Vorhaus and Moore dissected the implications of the privacy policies of two personal genomics companies, TruGenetics…

In this series of three guest posts, lawyers Daniel Vorhaus and Lawrence Moore of the excellent Genomics Law Report provide insight into the intriguing question of what happens to customers’ genetic data in the event that a personal genomics company goes out of business. Part II and III of this series will be posted over…

The NY Times has an article entitled “Buyer beware of home DNA tests” that adopts the paternalistic party line of the medical establishment: taking DNA tests without a doctor’s advice is hazardous to your health. Remarkably, the article acknowledges that qualified genetic counsellors are few and far between and that “most practicing physicians lack the…

Sequencing giant Illumina has announced that it has delivered its first commercial personal genome sequence. The sequence was generated by the genome sequencing service launched by Illumina back in June, and was delivered in collaboration with new personal genomics company Pathway Genomics. Illumina’s genome sequencing service costs $48,000, and its first customer was entrepreneur Hermann…

Dan Vorhaus has a great post in Genomics Law Report outlining recommendations made by a recent NIH-CDC workshop on the scientific foundations of personal genomics. The workshop included key stake-holders from academia, policy advisory groups and the personal genomics industry.