next-generation sequencing

Genetic Future

Category archives for next-generation sequencing

In the last century infant mortality has declined precipitously in the Western world, thanks in large part to the development of antibiotics and vaccination. Yet as the suffering and death from infectious disease has reduced, the burden from genetic disease has become proportionately greater: currently around 20% of all infant deaths in developed countries are…

As part of his Gene Week celebration over at Forbes, Matthew Herper has a provocative post titled “Why you can’t have your $1000 genome“. In this post I’ll explain why, while Herper’s pessimism is absolutely justified for genomes produced in a medical setting, I’m confident that I’ll be obtaining my own near-$1000 genome in the…

More huge news in the sequencing industry, following on from the public share offer from Pacific Biosciences - relative newcomer to the field, Ion Torrent, has just been bought by Life Technologies for an impressive US$375 million in cash and stock, with an option to increase by a further US$350 million if “certain technical and time-based…

The long-awaited public stock offer from third-generation sequencing technology company Pacific Biosciences has finally arrived (here’s the SEC filing, and coverage from Matthew Herper and GenomeWeb). PacBio has already raised almost US$400 million in venture capital, and aims to increase this by up to US$200 million from its share offering. The sheer scale of these…

The first ever post on the new group blog I announced yesterday, Genomes Unzipped, is now live: it’s Luke Jostins of Genetic Inference talking about the importance of sequencing for the future of personal genomics. Here’s a taste: There is a particular type of variation that genotype chips can never get at, the type of…

Jay Flatley, CEO of sequencing giant Illumina, announced at the Consumer Genetics Conference today that the company had reduced the price of its retail whole-genome sequencing service. At $19,500 this still isn’t in the realm of an impulse buy for most of us, but it’s a long way down from the $48,000 that Illumina offered at…

Nick Loman (of the University of Birmingham, and the Pathogens: Genes and Genomes blog) has a post updating us on his survey of second-generation sequencing machines around the world. Loman’s results are also available in the format of a handy Google map (see left). The take-home messages based on 669 machines in the database: Illumina continues…

Zoe McDougall from Oxford Nanopore points me to a press release from Illumina announcing a new era of celebrity genomics: Illumina, Inc. (NASDAQ:ILMN) today announced that it has sequenced the DNA of American actress Glenn Close, the first publicly named female to have her DNA sequenced to full coverage. The service was completed in Illumina’s…

Dan Koboldt has a very nice recap of the various sequencing technologies presented at last week’s Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting. I totally agree with his central point: Something had been bothering me about the sequencing-company presentations this year, and I finally realized what it was. During AGBT 2009, every player was gunning…

The main theme of this year’s Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting should come as no surprise to regular readers: sequencing. Generating as many bases of DNA sequence as quickly, cheaply and accurately as possible is the goal of the moment, and the number of companies jostling to achieve that goal is growing rapidly.…