next-generation sequencing

Genetic Future

Category archives for next-generation sequencing

Stephen Turner from Pacific Biosciences gave a dramatic presentation this afternoon launching PacBio’s new third-generation sequencing instrument. The room was packed for the seminar, with a palpable buzz, and Turner’s presentation was preceded by a theatrical introduction from PacBio CEO Hugh Martin.  The crescendo of Turner’s presentation was the unveiling of a video showing the…

Belated news from AGBT

I’ve been remiss in blogging from the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting here in Marco Island, Florida, primarily due to some panic-stricken last-minute changes to the slides for my own presentation last night. Fortunately the conference has been extremely well-covered by others: Sanger colleague Luke Jostins has blog posts up summarising day 1…

I’ll be at the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting in Marco Island, Florida for the next week, soaking up sun and genomics, keeping my eye out for the anticipated major announcements from sequencing companies and researchers, and quietly panicking about my presentation on Thursday. You’ll hear more about the meeting from me and…

The big news from the JP Morgan investment conference today is the announcement of a brand new shiny sequencing machine from Illumina, the HiSeq 2000. The new machine boasts an impressive set of statistics, and looks likely to gradually replace Illumina’s GAIIx as the workhorse of most modern sequencing facilities. So, how excited should we…

The Gene Sherpa predicts that Complete Genomics will win the Archon X Prize in Genomics in 2010. In the comments, Keith Robison is wisely skeptical. I agree with Keith – it’s unlikely that the X Prize will be won this year, and if it is the winner is unlikely to be Complete Genomics. For those…

IBM’s announcement that it will be entering the DNA sequencing technology race (which I mentioned briefly earlier today) has created a tremendous amount of mainstream media interest. That’s understandable given IBM’s size and history of innovation, but how likely are they to represent serious contenders for the potentially lucrative sequencing market? Firstly, it’s important to…

News in genomics

Things are as usual moving at ludicrous speed in the world of genomics, but sadly I only have time to post a few pointers to some of the most striking developments. IBM is moving into the third-generation sequencing arena. The company is developing a new sequencing technology based on tiny nanopores – a field already…

Kevin Davies from Bio-IT World has two interviews up today relevant to new DNA sequencing technologies. Firstly, there’s an excellent interview with Clive Brown, vice president of development and informatics for Oxford Nanopore Technologies – one of the most promising contenders in the rapidly evolving third-generation DNA sequencing market. Brown is renowned for his plain-speaking…

Sequencing giant Illumina has announced that it has delivered its first commercial personal genome sequence. The sequence was generated by the genome sequencing service launched by Illumina back in June, and was delivered in collaboration with new personal genomics company Pathway Genomics. Illumina’s genome sequencing service costs $48,000, and its first customer was entrepreneur Hermann…

Complete Genomics is finally back on the road towards fulfilling its promises of $5000 human genome sequences, after delays in obtaining funding for a massive new facility pushed back its plans by six months. The $45 million in funding it announced this week will be sufficient to build the new Silicon Valley facility, which the company…