next-generation sequencing

Genetic Future

Category archives for next-generation sequencing

I’ve just discovered a very promising new blog in the genomics sphere (well, technically it’s a newly relaunched blog) run by a group at the University of Birmingham. Two posts by Nick Loman are of immediate interest to readers here. Firstly, I highly recommend Nick’s thorough dissection of accusations made by Applied Biosystems’ Kevin McKernan in a recent…

The announcement of the Helicos genome sequence (which I’ve already discussed in detail) engendered a huge amount of media interest, sometimes for the wrong reasons.  Having the media attention directed elsewhere in the third-generation sequencing space was clearly an unwelcome experience for Helicos competitors Pacific Biosciences, who have responded with a press release announcing the…

David Dooling has an entertaining take on the Helicos genome sequence I discussed yesterday entitled “Another rich white guy sequences own genome”.  I noted in my post yesterday that the alleged price drop for the Helicos sequence over current technologies was an illusion, but David includes a much more thorough analysis of the relative genome…

Pushkarev, D., Neff, N., & Quake, S. (2009). Single-molecule sequencing of an individual human genome Nature Biotechnology DOI: 10.1038/nbt.1561 Yes, it’s yet another “complete” individual genome sequence, following on the heels of Craig Venter, James Watson, an anonymous African male (twice, and not without controversy), two cancer patients, a Chinese man, and two Koreans.  There is a…

While I continue my work-induced blog coma, here’s a guest post from Luke Jostins, a genetic epidemiology PhD student and the author of the blog Genetic Inference, delivering a fairly scathing critique of a recent whole-genome sequencing paper based on Life Technologies’ SOLiD platform. McKernan et al. 2009. Sequence and structural variation in a human…

The buzz leading up to this week’s Consumer Genetics Show in Boston suggested that a major announcement would be made by the CEO of genomics technology provider Illumina, Jay Flatley. Illumina provides the most popular second-generation sequencing instrument currently on the market, the Genome Analyzer II, and has been making noises about moving into the…

I wrote a few days ago about a debate in the New England Journal of Medicine over the value of data emerging from recent genome-wide studies of the role of genetic variation in common human diseases and other traits. David Goldstein argued that genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated disappointing results, and should be scaled…

Keith Robison notes that commercial DNA sequencing is now cheap enough to seriously consider generating and analysing a bacterial genome sequence as an undergraduate group-work project. I think it’s a fantastic idea in principle, and would certainly give students a flavour of the reality of modern genomics – but the prospect of coordinating hundreds of…

I discussed the second-generation sequencing company Complete Genomics a couple of weeks ago (see here and here). These guys are unique in that they offer their technology only as a service, rather than the usual business model of selling platforms to genomics facilities, and a highly restricted service at that: Complete has stated fairly categorically…

James Clarke, Hai-Chen Wu, Lakmal Jayasinghe, Alpesh Patel, Stuart Reid, Hagan Bayley (2009). Continuous base identification for single-molecule nanopore DNA sequencing Nature Nanotechnology DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2009.12 The clever boys and girls at Oxford Nanopore Technologies – one of the most quietly impressive contenders in the hotly-contested next-generation DNA sequencing race – have a new paper out…