next-generation sequencing

Genetic Future

Category archives for next-generation sequencing

Regular readers will know that I’m at the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting this week, one of the most highly-awaited meetings on the genomics calendar. There’s a huge amount of fascinating data being presented (anyone interested in a blow-by-blow account should follow Anthony Fejes’ live-blogging), but there’s definitely an overarching theme: the…

Complete Genomics is a DNA sequencing company that launched back in October, and has been creating a buzz in the genomics community ever since. The company’s business model is based around a novel technology for rapidly generating DNA sequence data; but rather than make its money by selling its platform to genomics facilities and biotech…

Looking forward to AGBT

I’ll be at the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting next week – this will be my my first experience of this annual conference on Florida’s picturesque Marco Island, but I already have high expectations based on reports from previous years. The programme is packed with cutting-edge genomics, and to be honest after a…

Welcome to the 42nd edition of Gene Genie, the blog carnival of clinical genetics and personalised medicine. Most of the entries in this edition fall under the broad umbrella of personalised genetics, with posts emphasising both the pros and cons of the emerging consumer genetic testing industry. The promise and perils of personalised genetics Hsien-Hsien…

Well, it’s a little late, but I finally have a list of what I see as some of the major trends that will play out in the human genomics field in 2009 – both in terms of research outcomes, and shifts in the rapidly-evolving consumer genomics industry. For genetics-savvy readers a lot of these predictions…

Still quite a way, based on this survey of second-generation sequencing users (subscription only, I think) conducted by the industry publication In Sequence. Along with a range of other questions, the survey asked users about the cost to generate one billion base pairs (one gigabase, or Gb) on their platform at the end of 2008,…

A press release today describes a potentially exciting partnership between two companies in the DNA sequencing space: Oxford Nanopore Technologies and Illumina. Illumina is an established player in the field, providing one of the most widely-used second-generation sequencing platforms (the Genome Analyzer, previously known as Solexa). Oxford, in contrast, is a young but promising contestant…

Sanger sequencing is not dead?

Daniel G. Hert, Christopher P. Fredlake, Annelise E. Barron (2008). Advantages and limitations of next-generation sequencing technologies: A comparison of electrophoresis and non-electrophoresis methods Electrophoresis, 29 (23), 4618-4626 DOI: 10.1002/elps.200800456 The dideoxy termination method of DNA sequencing (often called Sanger sequencing after the technique’s inventor, Fred Sanger) has been the workhorse of pretty much every…

Sure is news to me – from popsci.com: Archon X Prize for Genomics Purse: $10 million Goal: Sequence 100 human genomes in 10 days for $10,000 per genome or less Status: ZS Genetics, which is developing an approach that replaces fluorescent tagging with decodable electron-microscope images of DNA, is a favorite to win. [my emphasis]…

Nature has a list of the top news stories of 2008, and “Personal genomics goes mainstream” comes up second: In January, an international consortium announced the launch of the 1,000 Genomes Project, which aims to provide a catalogue of human genetic variation. In October, the Personal Genome Project, which hopes to sequence and publish the…