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Genetic Future

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Earlier this month I wrote a post skewering a terrible opinion piece about personal genomics in the Sunday Times by Camilla Long. This was my conclusion: If Long wishes to stay ignorant of her own genetic risks – just as she has managed to remain ignorant of the entire field of genetics, even while writing…

The Genomes Environments Traits conference in Boston is without a doubt the place to be on April 27th for anyone interested in personal genomics: the conference has managed to attract nearly every human being in the world who has had their complete genome sequenced (excluding, of course, anonymous participants in the 1000 Genomes Project and various cancer studies),…

My genetic future

My wife and I have embarked on our first collaborative genetic experiment:  Subscribe to Genetic Future.   Follow Daniel on Twitter

A reader pointed me to this article in the Australian news: it appears that a major Australian insurance company, NIB, is planning to offer half-price genome scans from personal genomics company Navigenics to 5,000 of its customers.  The catch is in the fine print: those who take up the offer “may have to give the…

Yesterday I posted a brief rant about the need for researchers to think about the best way to return genetic research data to participants, spinning off an equally brief opinion piece I wrote for the ongoing ELSI series at Genomics Law Report. Today Dan Vorhaus has posted an excellent piece on the same topic over at…

My contribution to Genomics Law Report’s superb “What ELSI is New” series is up now. The gist of my argument: as we move into an era of large-scale whole-genome sequencing studies and the utility of genomic information grows, researchers will increasingly frequently be faced with the discovery of highly medically relevant information within their subjects’…

The latest issue of Nature contains an embarrassment of riches for those of us interested in personal genomics, and indeed I’m having trouble figuring out which article to write about first. Just look at the options: there’s a review on approaches to tracking down the missing heritability of common diseases; there’s a potentially highly controversial plea…

In this final post of their three-part series, lawyers Daniel Vorhaus and Lawrence Moore of the superb blog Genomics Law Report analyse the legal repercussions of a personal genomics company going bankrupt. In part one of the series Vorhaus and Moore analysed the privacy policies of two representative personal genomics companies, while part two was a…

My esteemed blogging colleague Ginny Hughes will be presenting at next week’s Cold Spring Harbor Personal Genomes meeting (which I, sadly, will not be attending) on genetic testing for psychiatric diseases. As part of preparing for this she’d like to get a sense of the level of interest in this type of testing. If you…

Most of the posts I’ve written recently have involved next-generation DNA sequencing in one way or another, which may have left some readers scratching their heads – keeping track of the different technologies, how they work, and their strengths and weaknesses is a challenge even for those immersed in this fast-moving field. Fortunately, help is…