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A quick pointer to a new blog on the genomics scene that’s just been officially launched: Genomics Law Report, a corporate blog from legal firm Robinson, Bradshaw and Hinson. One of the contributors, Dan Vorhaus, is an advisor to the Personal Genome Project and provides one of the highest signal-to-noise ratio genomics feeds on Twitter.…

Photo Synthesis

I usually try to maintain a fairly single-minded focus on genomics on this blog, but Alex Wild’s current series of post on insect photography over at Photo Synthesis is simply stunning. Anyone interested in either photography or entomology – or simply appreciative of a beautiful image – should wander over and check them out. Alex’s…

Nutrigenomics is a word typically associated with shady companies trying to use genetic tests to sell you expensive diets – but GenomeWeb News reports that the area may finally be receiving some legitimate scientific attention: The Salk Institute today said that it will use a $5.5 million grant from the Leona M. and Harry B.…

I ranted yesterday about two misleading pieces in the Telegraph (an opinion piece from Steve Jones, and a follow-up article) that sequentially converted a debate between scientists over the value of genome-wide association studies and the future of genetic research into a broader indictment of the last few years of common disease genetics. Mark Walport,…

Mark Henderson reports that an influential UK think-tank, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, has launched an inquiry into personalised medicine: The Nuffield working party includes nine scientists, social scientists, lawyers and philosophers. It will consider whether genetic tests ought to be regulated more tightly, and whether people who buy them and then consult their GPs…

Jonathan Eisen summarises the major themes from the Joint Genome Institute meeting. He has a numbered list of 20 highlights – here’s a few that I thought would be of most interest to Genetic Future readers: 2. Ecological and population genomics are truly the next big thing. 3. Related to the above point, one of the…

Dieting to fit into your genes

Mary Mangan at Open Helix predicts that personal genomics will trigger the appearance of a brand new eating disorder: geneorexia nervosa. …there will be a proportion of people who take their genetic information (which I know is of varying utility at best right now to those who have been sequenced ), and they’ll change their…

From an editorial in this week’s Nature: Indeed, researchers would do well to blog more than they do. The experience of journals such as Cell and PLoS ONE, which allow people to comment on papers online, suggests that researchers are very reluctant to engage in such forums. But the blogosphere tends to be less inhibited,…

Calling all Navigenics customers

Katherine Kelly is a molecular biology major at Princeton University currently writing her senior thesis on personal genome services. As part of her research she would like to interview customers of 23andMe and Navigenics about their experiences of the personal genomics process. The problem: although she can find plenty of 23andMe customers, she is yet…

Keith Robison from Omics! Omics! has a fun nostalgia piece looking back on his days in the midst of the genomics bubble of the late 90s. Subscribe to Genetic Future.