whole-genome sequencing

Genetic Future

Category archives for whole-genome sequencing

In a comment on my previous post, Tera Eerkes is skeptical about the utility of routinely performing whole-genome sequencing on newborns: I found this comment absolutely fascinating, given the recent reports on translational analysis, that indicate an actual lack of clinical utility of KRAS testing and other drug-gene interactions. I believe these reports are indicative…

I’m slowly catching up on genomics news from the last week – this story in particular has been getting a lot of press. The executive summary: Jay Flatley, CEO of genomic technology manufacturer Illumina, predicts that whole-genome sequencing of newborns will become routine within a decade. Flatley has an obvious financial interest in this prediction…

Welcome to the 42nd edition of Gene Genie, the blog carnival of clinical genetics and personalised medicine. Most of the entries in this edition fall under the broad umbrella of personalised genetics, with posts emphasising both the pros and cons of the emerging consumer genetic testing industry. The promise and perils of personalised genetics Hsien-Hsien…

Well, it’s a little late, but I finally have a list of what I see as some of the major trends that will play out in the human genomics field in 2009 – both in terms of research outcomes, and shifts in the rapidly-evolving consumer genomics industry. For genetics-savvy readers a lot of these predictions…

A new paper in Bioinformatics describes an efficient compression algorithm that allows an individual’s complete genome sequence to be compressed down to a vanishingly small amount of data – just 4 megabytes (MB). The paper takes a similar approach to the process I described in a post back in June last year (sheesh, if only…

Still quite a way, based on this survey of second-generation sequencing users (subscription only, I think) conducted by the industry publication In Sequence. Along with a range of other questions, the survey asked users about the cost to generate one billion base pairs (one gigabase, or Gb) on their platform at the end of 2008,…

Nature has a list of the top news stories of 2008, and “Personal genomics goes mainstream” comes up second: In January, an international consortium announced the launch of the 1,000 Genomes Project, which aims to provide a catalogue of human genetic variation. In October, the Personal Genome Project, which hopes to sequence and publish the…

David Ewing Duncan has a piece in Portfolio.com about Complete Genomics, a DNA sequencing company that launched back in October promising to offer whole-genome sequencing for $5000 by mid-2009. Complete Genomics is based on some allegedly powerful new technology (here’s a cartoon summary) developed in-house – I say “allegedly” because the company is yet to…

Pharmacogenomics Reporter has a fascinating article (subscription only, I think) on the impact of individual gene patents granted by the US patenting system on the future of personal genomics. Essentially, the issue for companies conducting genome-wide analysis (including SNP chips or whole-genome sequencing) is that setting up licensing deals for each individual gene makes business…

Last week I posted on the publication of three papers in Nature describing whole-genome sequencing using next-generation technology: one African genome, one Asian genome, and two genomes from a female cancer patient (one from her cancer cells and one from healthy skin tissue). At the end of that post I noted that the era of…