Gene Expression

Archives for August, 2008

Movies; watch, and don’t

Tropic Thunder is worth watching again at a matinee price just for a closer observation of Tom Cruise’s scenes. Pineapple Express is not worth a matinee price.

Biden

Hey, so everyone’s saying that it’s Biden. From my rather politically uncomitted and unobsessed perspective, one word: anti-climactic.

My previous post, Weird lands of the tails, had some concepts implicit which I didn’t elucidate in detail. For example, I assumed that the speed is a quantitative trait, and the many genes which control its variation have pleiotropic effects. That is, gene 1 has effect on phenotypes 1 through n. Gene 2 has effect…

Weird lands of the tails

Yesterday’s post on the speed of Jamaican sprinters, and Genetic Future’s skepticism of a one-gene answer for their dominance. The discussion brought up some adaptive talk; I’m not against adaptation, and I think it’s entirely plausible that populations differ enough in the distribution of phenotypes that there are different genetic potentialities…but, I have some issues…

Why are Jamaicans so fast?

I haven’t been watching the Olympics, but my news feeds are broad enough that I get a general sense of who is winning, and who is not. Over at Genetic Future Dan MacArthur has a post up, The gene for Jamaican sprinting success? No, not really: And Bolt is not the only Jamaican to impress…

A personal experience of mine is that many apostates from religion have…issues. On the other hand, people who were raised, or always were, atheists tend to mostly be almost confused by religion. But I was curious as to possible differences between these two groups, and those believe in God, or were unbelievers and now believed…

Beware the dark-eyed

p-ter points me to a new paper in Trends in Ecology, Pleiotropy in the melanocortin system, coloration and behavioural syndromes: In vertebrates, melanin-based coloration is often associated with variation in physiological and behavioural traits. We propose that this association stems from pleiotropic effects of the genes regulating the synthesis of brown to black eumelanin. The…

In the United States we have the free speech built into the law, so it is somewhat a moot point. Of course, as evidenced by comments in many other Western countries the limits to speech are bounded by public consensus. So I decided to look at the GSS in terms of response to one question:…

France and nuclear power

France Reaffirms Its Faith in Future of Nuclear Power: Nuclear power provides 77 percent of France’s electricity, according to the government, and relatively few public doubts are expressed in a country with little coal, oil or natural gas. … France generates half of its own total energy, up from 23 percent in 1973, despite increased…

MHC-correlated odour preferences in humans and the use of oral contraceptives: Previous studies in animals and humans show that genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influence individual odours and that females often prefer odour of MHC-dissimilar males, perhaps to increase offspring heterozygosity or reduce inbreeding. Women using oral hormonal contraceptives have been reported to…