Gene Expression

Katz

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Comments

  1. #1 zyxwvutsr
    November 20, 2009

    I like cats. I love photography.

    May I humbly suggest that you learn how to use your camera? Or, perhaps, obtain a more sophisticated camera?

    Specifically, there are leaves in focus in a plane *behind* the cat. That’s okay, I suppose, but the topic should be “leavz.”

    (That’s all easier said than done, I know. So.)

  2. #2 Greg Laden
    November 20, 2009

    Yeah, really, man, those cats are FUZZY and the leaves are SHARP EDGED.

    Oh, wait, cats ARE fuzzy. Leaves ARE sharp edge.

    Totally artistic.

  3. #3 Monado
    November 21, 2009

    My camera does that sometimes. I point it right at the cat and the focus point jumps off to the side, deciding that some random assemblage is a face and deserves to be the focus point. It’s just a side effect of getting a camera with a mind of its own.

  4. #4 katfotog
    November 21, 2009

    May I humbly suggest that you learn how to use your camera? Or, perhaps, obtain a more sophisticated camera?

    Specifically, there are leaves in focus in a plane *behind* the cat. That’s okay, I suppose, but the topic should be “leavz.”
    (That’s all easier said than done, I know. So.)

    shooting a moving kat at twilight with a $30 camera isn’t ideal. these are reject images, posted only because the $30 camera died before katz were photographed this week. if you’re not just commenting to feel fancy, feel free to contact your blogger for details on contributing to his camera upgrade fund.

  5. #5 Susannah
    November 21, 2009

    Monado #3. So that’s why it does that! It thinks those rocks/leaves/sticks/whatever are a face!

    Totally frustrating for people who take photos of things without faces. Sometimes I re-focus three or four times, moving the camera a bit each time, to get the durn thing to focus on what I want. And by then, whatever it was has moved.

    I wonder if there’s a setting to turn off face recognition?

  6. #6 zyxwvutsr
    November 21, 2009

    Dunno what kind of camera any of you have, but many have some sort of mode that allows you to choose a particular focus point. Perhaps more usefully, though, most of them (pretty much all that I have seen) allow a focus-lock, usually with a half-press of the shutter button.

    If your camera has trouble focusing on a fuzzy cat (not surprising with point & shoot cams that use “contrast difference detection” autofocus systems) the workaround is focusing on a high-contrast target in the same plane as the cat. In this case the edge of the fence (or perhaps the grain of the wood) might have been a good focus target.

    Another standard technique is “focus and recompose,” i.e., place one of the focus points over a high-contrast object in the same plane of focus, half-press the shutter to achieve focus lock, and then (still holding the half-press) move the camera to place the subject in the desired portion of the frame. If you practice doing that enough it will become second nature. (I should note that it is not a perfect technique and can introduce a couple problems: closeups may end up out of focus because of parallax error, and, since the camera probably locks exposure with autofocus, a dramatically different composition may result in an over- or under-exposed photo.)

    (I suppose I am just being fancy. And, no, I do not have any cash laying around to contribute to a camera upgrade fund. I have my own cameras to upgrade.)

    p.s. It is likely that a camera with face-detection will allow you to turn that feature off.