genetic relatedness

Gene Expression

Tag archives for genetic relatedness

An ancestry informative marker set for determining continental origin: validation and extension using human genome diversity panels: Results In this study, genotypes from Human Genome Diversity Panel populations were used to further evaluate a 93 SNP AIM panel, a subset of the 128 AIMS set, for distinguishing continental origins. Using both model-based and relatively model-independent…

In the comments below on the post on human population structure there was some request for a bigger global perspective. Below the fold I’ve placed a table with FST values which compare each population to the other. This an older population genetic statistic derived from the work of Sewall Wright, but you are almost certainly…

I still remember when L. L. Cavalli-Sforza’s The History and Geography of Human Genes was a candle in the dark, illuminating human history with slivers of genetic data laboriously gathered and analyzed over decades. We’ve come a long way. Dienekes points me to a new paper, Fine-scaled human genetic structure revealed by SNP microarrays: We…

One New World population expansion

Haplotypic Background of a Private Allele at High Frequency in the Americas: Recently, the observation of a high-frequency private allele, the 9-repeat allele at microsatellite D9S1120, in all sampled Native American and Western Beringian populations has been interpreted as evidence that all modern Native Americans descend primarily from a single founding population. However, this inference…

Dan MacArthur has a post, Genetics of complex traits in Europeans and East Asians: similarities and differences: With those goals in mind, you can expect to see many more GWAS of non-European populations over the next couple of years, and some explicit comparisons of the differing genetic architecture of complex traits between populations. Exciting times…

Genetic closeness != behavioral closeness

Sheril’s post, Chimpanzees Are NOT Pets!, is good. She notes: 1 Chimpanzees are wild animals. Animals that make good PETS like dogs and cats, have been domesticated for [thousands] of years. There has been selection on them against aggression, which is why a dog, unlike a wolf, will not automatically tear you to pieces. Anyone…