GSS

Gene Expression

Tag archives for GSS

Data analysis elsewhere

I show that Protestants like Israel; Midwesterners not so much, at Secular Right. Also, many nations are getting more religious, but young people are still less religious, at Gene Expression Classic.

On a lark I decided to see how Catholics & Protestants broke down in regards to evolution by American region in the GSS. Specifically, I clustered the Census Divisions to create the categories of: Northeast = New England + Mid Atlantic Midwest = E & W North Central South = S Atlantic + E South…

The use of the word “Darwinist” is to catch the attention of Creationists, normally I’m not too warm to its usage in a scientific (as opposed to philosophical or historical) context. In any case, Jerry Coyne has a post up where he states: The “new atheists” have been on the scene for exactly five years,…

A comment below asks: Well, good for you for getting me to click through by using an interesting post title. But how do you know women who “know god exists” aren’t assuming a female god? In a vacuum of all knowledge about this sort of topic this is a reasonable question. But there’s plenty of…

Women bow down before the male god

On another weblog someone alluded to the sex difference in religious belief among black Americans, to the effect that it was more pronounced than among whites. Is this true? I decided to check the GSS, and found something interesting, though not too surprising. It’s a robust cross-cultural finding that women are more religious than men,…

I heard on the radio several times in the past few weeks commentators refer to minority opposition to gay marriage, specifically the fact that New York and California have large numbers of blacks and Latinos who are voters. I was curious if Latinos really are notably more opposed to gay marriage than non-Hispanic whites. So…

One of the arguments of some younger social conservatives (e.g., Ross Douthat) is that while the abortion wars are in stasis, the Right is losing ground when it comes to opposition to gay marriage. Is this true? Below are charts from the GSS with each column representing a year, from the mid-1970s to the 2000s…

Update: Readers pointed out that these results are from the cumulative data set from 1972-2002. So the % who favored laws against interracial marriage were ~40% in 1972, and ~10% in 2002, averaging out to ~25% across the years. The relative differences though seem to remain the same across categories. The nature of party identification…