There is an ongoing effort to change the standards for teaching science in Orlando Florida so that the students are taught actual science (as opposed to creationism, apparently) in an effort to bring the next generation’s work force into the 21st century. And the public meetings are apparently getting interesting.

The new standards are widely opposed among both parents and teachers, who feel that creationism has a place in the science classroom.

Dave Finnigan, an educational consultant who lives in Celebration, said the Scopes trial should have settled the issue. Intelligent design, he said, is a thinly veiled religious theory that doesn’t belong in public schools.
[source]

Dave obviously has not read his history. The evolutionists lost the scopes trial. But, his intentions are good:

“Evolution is a fact, and you can’t dispute it,” Finnigan said. “We say it’s the ‘theory’ of gravity. It doesn’t turn gravity off.”

OK, that’s a good start, I think. I suppose the parallel would be that we say “Evolution is not true” and suddenly we all turn into furry chip-like creatures. But Dave’s intentions are good. Anyway, back to Orlando:

…several people who spoke Thursday urged state Department of Education officials to allow schools to teach intelligent design and other theories along with evolution.

Teacher and parent Veronica Bryant said there’s a lack of fossil evidence to support evolution and that the complexity of life defies it.

“Real science can stand up against other theories,” said Bryant, who teaches math at Silver Star Center, an alternative school. “There is nothing wrong with offering alternative viewpoints.”

Hey, thanks, math teacher. Why don’t you just stay out of it! You don’t have biology teachers going over to your side of the building and insisting that one plus one equals 3!

The public commenting period ends on December 14th.

You could go to the Orlando Sentinel and chime in with your comments.


[Orlando Sentinel]

Comments

  1. #1 decrepitoldfool
    November 18, 2007

    “There is nothing wrong with offering alternative viewpoints.”

    Ahh, ‘Teach the controversy’. Next up: we hold a poll to find out from ninth-graders whether string theory is correct.

  2. #2 Moopheus
    November 18, 2007

    “Next up: we hold a poll to find out from ninth-graders whether string theory is correct.”

    Actually, I think we had that covered in grade school. Then we called it silly-string theory. There was also string-art theory, but hey, it was the 70s.

Current ye@r *