Did you hear…

The one about the creationist surprised when he lost his job at a major research institution?

The battle between science and creationism has reached the prestigious Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where a former researcher is claiming he was fired because he doesn’t believe in evolution.
more stories like this

Nathaniel Abraham filed a lawsuit earlier this week in US District Court in Boston saying that the Cape Cod research center dismissed him in 2004 because of his Christian belief that the Bible presents a true account of human creation.
[source]

Read a critique of the situation at Pharyngula.

The one about Subscription-supported journals [that] are like the qwerty keyboard

As you probably know, the arrangement of letters on the ‘qwerty’ keyboard that all our computers come with is far from optimal for efficient typing. The original mechanical typewriters had the keys arranged alphabetically. But this caused levers to jam up if their letters were typed in rapid succession, so a key arrangement was devised that interspersed the commonly used letters with uncommon letters, and split up commonly-used sequences of letters. This was a good solution: although it slowed down the speed at which a skilled typist could hit the keys, it eliminated the time they would otherwise have to spend unjamming the levers. You can read all about this on Wikipedia.

don’t worry, he relates to to subscription supported journals very nicely…

..the one about the world population, and how it is determined by food supply? Or not?

Back in May, Growth is Madness! hosted a guest post by Dr. Russell Hopfenberg, a consulting faculty member at Duke University, “to discuss his work on the links between food supply, carrying capacity, and population growth. In two peer reviewed journal articles, one coauthored by David Pimentel, Russ has analyzed and investigated the relationship between between human population and food supply. His conclusion is that global food supply is the variable which best accounts for human carrying capacity, and that human population will continue to grow as long as food supply increases.”


the one about how Isaac Newton was a total nut job?

Isaac Newton was a total nutjob. Did you know that he tried to pop his own eyeball out with a knitting needle as a part of an experiment? That he nearly blinded himself staring into the sun? That he was an avid alchemist?

Comments

  1. #1 John Evo
    December 7, 2007

    Isaac Newton was a total nutjob. Did you know that he tried to pop his own eyeball out with a knitting needle as a part of an experiment? That he nearly blinded himself staring into the sun? That he was an avid alchemist?

    And don’t forget – his biggest issue with the church was not over god’s existence, but over who had the best “Trinity” story… those who saw the Trinity as “one” or those who saw them as three separate entities.

    Mercury poisoning from all those alchemy experiments.

  2. #2 Trinifar
    December 8, 2007

    Wow, I feel I got hit by one of the hundreds of pellets from the shotgun that is Gred Laden, webhunter extraordinaire! (Is anyone a more prolific poster?)

    A word about Hopfenberg: Let’s assume his conclusion holds, that human population is a deterministic function of food supply, a typical logistic function. Does that mean at some future time when you think population is too high, you cut back on food supply? That’s the first line of questioning he has to — and does — face. The more interesting line of questioning, to my mind, has to do with drivers regional population. Hopfenberg’s result is only about global population. What are the real drivers of regional population growth — especially in places like Nigeria and the Sudan? Knowing that would inform policy choices and planning activies in a useful way.

    So, now that you are a SciBling, how about advocating for adding a demographer and an ecologist to your sliblinghood — perhaps even an ecological economist? :-)

    PS Thanks for the link.

  3. #3 Greg Laden
    December 8, 2007

    interesting.