Icons of Evolution

There are two books called “Icons of Evolution.” One is by Jonathan Wells. The best way to learn about Well’s Icons of Evolution is to watch Randy Olson’s Flock of Dodos. It is an anti science piece of dreck.

The other is a more recently published is Icons of Evolution [Two Volumes]: An Encyclopedia of People, Evidence, and Controversies (Greenwood Icons), and it is an entirely different book. I have heard about this book, but not read it. Since it came up in a comment I thought I’d give you a direct link and a little bit of information. Info from the publisher:

Students and the general public are frequently confronted with contradictory and confusing claims about the people, ideas, and artifacts that were essential in the development of the science of evolution. Where can they find accurate and understandable information on these important concepts? Icons of Evolution comprises twenty-four in-depth essays on the most famous ideas, artifacts, people and places of evolutionary biology. Dinosaurs, Neanderthals, Charles Darwin, peppered moths, carbon dating, the fossil record, and more, are explained by some of the most respected scientists, historians, and philosophers of evolution in the world. Icons of Evolution dispels some of the myths and confusion about evolution and answers questions like:
i-5dbc99f62455bf02583988df1d8466a5-icons.jpg
What do all those horse fossils mean?
Was Archaeopteryx the first bird?
What is a missing link and is it missing?
Did Peking Man really disappear?
Where did the word fossil come from?
What does ‘survival of the fittest’ really mean?
Why does the idea of evolution seem to scare people so much?

While written by technical experts, Icons of Evolution uses non-technical language that explains these icons for readers new to the field and for those seeking more depth. Taken together these icons tell a story that is sometimes fascinating, sometimes puzzling, always thought provoking. It is a story billions of years in the making, and one that everyone needs to know.

Icons of Evolution is listd at $175.00. Ouch.

Comments

  1. #1 Laelaps
    March 9, 2008

    The 2nd book (not Wells’) isn’t a bad idea, but if it costs so much then it’s essentially irrelevant. No one is going to buy it, a handful of people might read it, but it won’t be effective because it’ll simply fizzle out and generally be forgotten. There are plenty of books that have been written in recent years with the aim of refuting creationism, but in general they seem to have little effect. We might know about them and read them, but the people who should be generally don’t.

  2. #2 pough
    March 9, 2008

    It is an anti science piece of dreck.

    Pronoun antecedent: ambiguous.

    “…watch Randy Olson’s Flock of Dodos. It is an anti science piece of dreck.”

  3. #3 Greg Laden
    March 9, 2008

    What is this, correct Greg week?

    You are flat out wrong, Pough. In proper grammatical English, the noun located nearest the pronoun (prior to it) is assumed to be the antecedent. The noun nearest my pronoun is “Flock of Dodo’s” … and as we know from Randy’s film, flocks of dodo’s are anti-science pieces of dreck.