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A noted hurricane researcher predicted Wednesday that rising water temperatures in the Atlantic will bring a “well above average” storm season this year, including four major storms.

The updated forecast by William Gray’s team at Colorado State University calls for 15 named storms in the Atlantic in 2008 and says there’s a better than average chance that at least one major hurricane will hit the United States.

An average of 5.9 hurricanes form in the Atlantic each year.

“The Atlantic is a bit warmer than in the past couple of years,” said Phil Klotzbach, a member of the forecast team. “That is something we would like to keep an eye on.”

[source]

Comments

  1. #1 Tony P
    April 10, 2008

    We’re long overdue for a hurricane in the northeast. Last one was Bob and it was kind of a wet paper bag affair in 1991. So it’s been 17 years.
    I fear the next one will be quite a bit worse though. We’ve already had flooding due to heavy rains, something I never saw before last year.

  2. #2 Greg Laden
    April 10, 2008

    I remember bob. It still had an organized eye, which I was in for a while.

  3. #3 Woody
    April 12, 2008

    Kerry Emanual Reconsiders Global Warming Impact on Hurricanes

    One of the most influential scientists behind the theory that global warming has intensified recent hurricane activity says he will reconsider his stand.

    The hurricane expert, Kerry Emanuel of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, unveiled a novel technique for predicting future hurricane activity this week. The new work suggests that, even in a dramatically warming world, hurricane frequency and intensity may not substantially rise during the next two centuries.

    …This is another blow to climate alarmists and Gore’s AIT, where the ‘science’ is presented as being ‘settled.’ ….